single displacement reaction examples

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Question:What type of reaction is the following? 2Fe2O3 + 3C -> 4Fe + 3CO2 Why is this not considered to be a single-displacement reaction? Provide two written definitions of an oxidation-reduction reaction. For each definition, tell which reactant in the above reaction is reduced and which is oxidized. Which of the two definitions is the most comprehensive? ...I don't get why it's not single-displacement...please help! @pisgahchemist: Why doesn't it classify as a single-dis/replacement reaction? What technically keeps it from being considered as such?

Answers:There are many, many reactions which do not fit the format of the common synthesis, decomposition and single and double replacement reactions. There are many more reactions which we classify as "redox" reactions, and while single replacement reactions are also redox reactions, there are many redox reactions which are not single replacement reactions. Oxidation-reduction reactions involve the simultaneous transfer of electrons such that one element is being oxidized (loss of electrons, increase in oxidation number), and another element is being reduced (gain of electrons, decrease in oxidation number). 2Fe2O3 + 3C -> 4Fe + 3CO2 In your example, iron is being reduced and carbon is being oxidized. The iron appears to be gaining 3 electrons per atom while the oxidation number decreases (being reduced, so to speak). Carbon appears to be losing four electrons while the oxidation number is increasing from 0 to +4. Keep in mind that in Fe2O3 iron does not have an actual charge of +3, and carbon does not have an actual charge of +4. Those are the oxidation numbers. The electron "transfer" is actually being mitigated by the oxygen which does not change its oxidation number. ----------- Follow up ----------- Typically a single replacement reaction occurs when one metal replaces another one in a compound, or when one halogen replaces another one. In this case the oxygen is originally part of a metal oxide, and then goes to a nonmetal oxide. The general format for single replacement is this: "An element and a compound react to form an element and a compound". I suppose from that standpoint you could call it single replacement.

Question:What type of reaction is the following? 2Fe2O3 + 3C -> 4Fe + 3CO2 Why is this not considered to be a single-displacement reaction? Provide two written definitions of an oxidation-reduction reaction. For each definition, tell which reactant in the above reaction is reduced and which is oxidized. Which of the two definitions is the most comprehensive? ...I don't get why it's not single-displacement...please help!

Answers:To me this is splitting hairs, but a single displacement reaction usually involves a metal displacing a metal ion or a halogen displacing a halide ion. In these cases hydrogen can act as a metallic element. Check out these examples: Mg + 2HCl --> MgCl2 + H2 (magnesium displaces hydrogen) 2Al + 3CuCl2 --> 2AlCl3 + 3Cu (aluminum displaces copper) Cl2 + 2KBr --> 2KCl + Br2 (chlorine displaces bromine) What you've got here is a non-metal, carbon, displacing a metal, iron. Although this IS an oxidation-reduction reaction, I suppose it's not technically classified as single displacment because you don't have a metal displacing a metal or a halogen displacing a halide. The two definitions you're meant to use are probably specific to your particular class. I'd advise you to check your notes or textbook. As for your other question, iron is being reduced and carbon is being oxidized. There are two ways to know this: (1) Iron is "losing oxygen", which was one of the original definitions of reduction, while carbon is "gaining oxygen". (2) Iron's oxidation number decreasees from +3 to 0 while carbon's oxidation number increases from 0 to +4. I hope that helps. Good luck!

Question:Here is the question on my lab: Use the activity series of metals list to predict whether or not the following reactions will occur. Answer yes or no and explain why. a. Al + 3AgNO3 b.Cu + FeSO4 c. Zn + PbSO4 So far I have equation A as the only possible equation because aluminum is more active than silver on the chart, thus resulting in a chemical reaction. The other two equations would result in no reaction. Am I correct?

Answers:A. Yes. Al is higher in the activity series than Ag. B. No. Fe is a more active metal. C. Yes. Zn is higher in the activity series than Pb. You can check it with the source below.

Question:Write balanced chemical equation for the single replacement reaction of : 1.CuSO4 and Al 2.CuSO4 and Fe 3.Fe2(SO4)3 and Al 4.Fe2(SO4)3 and Cu 5.Pb(NO3)2 and Al 6.Pb(NO3)2 and CU 7.Al2(SO4)3 and Fe 8.Al2(SO4)3 and Pb 9.AgNO3 and Cu 10.AgNO3 and Pb 11.Which is MOST active and Which is LEAST active? 12.List the five metals in order of activity from LOWEST to HIGHEST.

Answers:No one is doing your homework for you. That is too much.

From Youtube

Single Displacement Reactions Part 1 :The following episode looks at the type of reaction called Single Displacement reactions. These reactions involve single molecules in the reactants and a different single molecule in the products. Keep in mind that if a metal is single in the reactants, the other metal will become single in the products (AS LONG AS if it follows the Activity series for metals). If a non-metal is single in the reactants , the other non-metal will be single in the products. Don't forget the cross over rule when writing the ionic compound. Download this episode for free from iTunes by typing the word "PapaPodcasts" in the search window.

Single Displacement Reactions Part 2 :The following episode looks at the type of reaction called Single Displacement reactions. These reactions involve single molecules in the reactants and a different single molecule in the products. Keep in mind that if a metal is single in the reactants, the other metal will become single in the products (AS LONG AS if it follows the Activity series for metals). If a non-metal is single in the reactants , the other non-metal will be single in the products. Don't forget the cross over rule when writing the ionic compound. Download this episode for free from iTunes by typing the word "PapaPodcasts" in the search window.