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Question:A. Mark completed in the five-mile run. B. Carly had a runny nose and a cough. C. Michelle runs every day at five o'clock. D. Eric put Ginger in the dog run before he went out. I choose A. because Mark run the five miles.

Answers:You've got three types of 'run'; noun, verb and adjective. A noun is a person place or thing. A verb is an action. And adjective describes a noun. I think it would be helpful for you in these type of questions to find the SUBJECT of each sentence and ask, 'What is the subject doing? to find the verb. You think A is the correct answer, and by your explanation that LOOKS right but: Mark is the subject, What is Mark doing? He is Competing. Run is not a verb here, here it means the same as race. What is the verb in B? this one is easy... Had is the verb, runny is an adjective. C Michelle is the subject, what does she do? SHE RUNS. HERE WE HAVE A VERB!!! D what did Eric do? He PUT. Here run is not a verb. A 'dog run' is a place where the animal can get some exercise. Good luck, I am sure your English is improving.

Question:the full sentence is this: we have seen that the constituent structre rules actually produce deep structures. this is my Linquistics exercise and I am thinking about it about 2 hours.please help me.

Answers:Well, it's impossible to draw diagrams in the Yahoo Answers interface, but the subject of the sentence is "We", the verb is "have seen" (past perfect), the direct object of the verb is the clause begining with "that...". The subject of the clause is "rules"; "constituent" and "structure" are modifiers of "rules". The verb of the clause is "produce"; "actually" modifies "produce". The direct object of the clause verb is "structures"; "deep" modifies "structures". I hope this helps you with your tree diagram.

Question:1. Which of the following words is the best close-up word? A. Plant B. Zucchini C. Food D. Vegetable 2. An antonym is a word that's A. defined in a thesaurus. B. the same in meaning. C. pronounced the same. D. opposite in meaning. 3. Which one of the following sentences is written in the active voice? A. Accidents are witnessed every day. B. However, few people think seriously of doing something about them. C. Accidents are considered by most people as unavoidable. D. But it is said that definite steps can be taken to prevent many accidents. 4. To put abstract ideas into close-up words, use _______ descriptions. A. faraway B. impersonal C. general D. concrete 5. A synonym is a word that's A. defined in a thesaurus. B. similar in meaning. C. pronounced the same. D. opposite in meaning. 6. Anna is an exceptional young girl. _______ Anna does any job that needs to be done. To vary the sentence structure, which one of the following sentences should you insert in the blank? A. Have you noticed how hard she works? B. Anna is always working hard at home. C. Anna works hard every day of her life. D. Anna is a hardworking and versatile person. 7. When we speak of the flavor of a word, we're talking about the extra understood meanings that it carries in addition to its main meaning. These extra meanings are called A. definitions. B. denotations. C. connotations. D. shadings. 8. Which is the best strategy to follow when you write a report or an essay? A. Get it right the first time and put it aside until it's due. B. Revise it over and over for at least three or four years. C. Write it in one sitting and revise it only once. D. Work on it over a seven-day period and rewrite it at least twice. 9. Which of the following statements about vocabulary building is not correct? A. The best way to improve your vocabulary is to memorize lists of vocabulary words. B. Reading on a daily basis is very important for building your vocabulary. C. Using the dictionary is only one step in the process of vocabulary building. D. Pronunciation is an important part of adding new words to your vocabulary. 10. What is the most important point in the following sentence? My sister, Emily, the tallest girl in her class, has many friends. A. Emily is my sister. B. Emily is the tallest girl in her class. C. Emily has many friends. D. My sister's name is Emily. 11. Which of the following direct quotations is punctuated properly? A. "Way to go, Sean," the coach shouted. "That was a great run!" B. "Way to go, Sean," the coach shouted. "That was a great run"! C. "Way to go, Sean", the coach shouted. "That was a great run"! D. "Way to go, Sean", the coach shouted. "That was a great run!" 12. Increasing your vocabulary means A. you'll write longer sentences. B. you'll write more lively sentences. C. you'll spend less time on revision. D. you'll be able to spend more time reading. 13. A clich is a _______ expression. A. new B. foreign C. worn-out D. wordy 14. Of the following methods, the best way to increase your reading is by A. reading a new book every day. B. forcing yourself to read subjects you dislike. C. setting a goal to read five new pages every night. D. joining a mail-order book club. 15. Freewriting is an exercise in which you A. revise and polish an essay. B. write whatever your thoughts are in no particular order. C. rewrite an article in a magazine or newspaper. D. write only grammatically correct sentences. 16. A thesaurus is a book that's useful for finding A. frequently misspelled words. B. synonyms. C. famous persons. D. definitions. 17. Find the sentence with the active voice. A. The chairman told me that the legislature passed the bill. B. It was voted by the legislature to pass. C. The bill was passed by the legislature. D. I was told by the chairman that the bill was passed by the legislature. 18. Nelson's hobby is tinkering with small appliances. Tinkering with implies that Nelson is unskilled at his hobby. You want to change the flavor of this sentence to show that Nelson is, in fact, quite skilled at his hobby. Which of the following should you choose to replace tinkering with so that the reader gets the right idea? A. Repairing B. Messing with C. Fiddling with D. Selling 19. Which one of the following statements about making your writing fun to read is not correct? A. The conversation you write must sound natural for the characters. B. Give your writing a personal touch by showing that you're interested in your subject. C. Direct quotations should be reserved for characters in stories. D. An anecdote or humorous quotation is often more convincing than a strong argument. 20. Which of the following sentences uses the best close-up words? A. Sara is pursuing a degree. B. Sara is pursuing a non-science degree. C. Sara is studyin

Answers:1. B 2. D 3. B 4. D 5. B 6. A 7. C 8. D 9. A 10. C 11. A 12. B 13. C 14. C 15. B 16. B 17. A 18. A 19. C or D depending on what you are writing 20. B

Question:#1. What is the STUTUTE OF LIMITATION on a 211 (Robbery) charge? #2. How do I file a Civil or Small Claims Court Case and WHO AGAINST for a false arrest 211 Robbery charge for PUNITIVE DAMAGES, Etc., which I was working at the time of this arrest, accused and arrested of this 211 robbery charge on 07/03/2007 through 07/19/2007. Release on this 07/19/2007, 211 robbery charge at about 7:30pm; 17 days of employment salary I've been lacked out of behind this accused of 211 robbery crime that I did not do, got and arrested the wrong person. Your innermost helpful suggestion and acknowledgement here is most highly appreciated! Thank you truly.

Answers:********* Persons providing false information or missleading statements that cause a false arrest can be sued and often loose in court. But not officers or officials of government. ********* Normally 7 years and set by each state. Bank Robbery is always a federal crime without limitation. Courts and Law enforcement agencies are instruments of government and can not be sued in small claims courts. They are at liberty to make certain mistakes without recourse so you may no be able to do anything. If you were falsely arrested because of an act of malice or prejudice there may be federal avenues. Title 18, U.S.C., Section 241 - Conspiracy Against Rights Title 18, U.S.C., Section 241 Conspiracy Against Rights This statute makes it unlawful for two or more persons to conspire to injure, oppress, threaten, or intimidate any person of any state, territory or district in the free exercise or enjoyment of any right or privilege secured to him/her by the Constitution or the laws of the United States, (or because of his/her having exercised the same). It further makes it unlawful for two or more persons to go in disguise on the highway or on the premises of another with the intent to prevent or hinder his/her free exercise or enjoyment of any rights so secured. Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to ten years, or both; and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years, or for life, or may be sentenced to death. Title 18, U.S.C., Section 242 - Deprivation of Rights Under Color of Law Title 18, U.S.C., Section 242 Deprivation of Rights Under Color of Law This statute makes it a crime for any person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation, or custom to willfully deprive or cause to be deprived from any person those rights, privileges, or immunities secured or protected by the Constitution and laws of the U.S. This law further prohibits a person acting under color of law, statute, ordinance, regulation or custom to willfully subject or cause to be subjected any person to different punishments, pains, or penalties, than those prescribed for punishment of citizens on account of such person being an alien or by reason of his/her color or race. Acts under "color of any law" include acts not only done by federal, state, or local officials within the bounds or limits of their lawful authority, but also acts done without and beyond the bounds of their lawful authority; provided that, in order for unlawful acts of any official to be done under "color of any law," the unlawful acts must be done while such official is purporting or pretending to act in the performance of his/her official duties. This definition includes, in addition to law enforcement officials, individuals such as Mayors, Council persons, Judges, Nursing Home Proprietors, Security Guards, etc., persons who are bound by laws, statutes ordinances, or customs. Punishment varies from a fine or imprisonment of up to one year, or both, and if bodily injury results or if such acts include the use, attempted use, or threatened use of a dangerous weapon, explosives, or fire shall be fined or imprisoned up to ten years or both, and if death results, or if such acts include kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or an attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title, or imprisoned for any term of years or for life, or both, or may be sentenced to death.

From Youtube

Basic Grammar: Kinds of Sentences :www.mindbites.com This basic English grammar lesson will outline kinds of sentences used in the English language. A sentence is a group of related words expressing a complete thought. There are four kinds of sentences: interrogative, imperative, assertive, exclamatory. "Won't you come into the house? Come into the house. We are in the house. What a cozy house! These are examples of the four kinds of sentences." Retired English teacher, Marie, invites us to join her inside her plant filled, music-infused, fire-warmed cottage with its spectacular A-framed view of the famous Discovery Passage. As she makes tea, munches on freshly baked chocolate chip cookies, and sits back in her favorite overstuffed chair, she explains why the above examples represent the four kinds of sentences: interrogative, imperative, assertive and exclamatory.Workbook exercises and answer key are provided with this lesson. Featured Music: Burgmuller - Ave Maria Bach - Prelude No.1, Handel - Little Fugue This lesson is excerpted from the Basic Cozy English Grammar course. The full course was created by, and is available from, Splashes from the River. You can check out this and other courses from Splashes at www.splashesfromtheriver.com.

Basic Grammar: Principal Clause, Compound Sentence :www.mindbites.com "A clause is a group of words that forms part of a sentence and has a subject and predicate. A principal clause makes a statement. It can stand alone like a simple sentence. A compound sentence contains two or more principal clauses usually joined by a co-ordinate conjunction." It is one of those late November, west coast days when the mood of the sky seems to change unpredictably - light and hopeful one moment, dark and brooding the next. Marie has decided to feed some stale bread to the seagulls. This is one of her favorite activities, and her giggly, singing enthusiasm is contagious as she seizes this opportunity to teach us about principal clauses and compound sentences. Sample sentences and examples are provided amidst the fluttering frenzy of her hungry feathered friends.Workbook exercises and answer key are provided with this lesson. Featured Music: Rackham - Lovely Little Seagulls This lesson is excerpted from the Basic Cozy English Grammar course. The full course was created by and is available from Splashes from the River. You can check out this and other courses from Splashes at www.splashesfromtheriver.com.