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From Wikipedia

Mixture

In chemistry, a mixture is a material system made up by two or more different substances which are (mixed) together but are not combined chemically. Mixture refers to the physical combination of two or more substances the identities of which are retained. The molecules of two or more different substances are mixed in the form of alloys, solutions, suspensions, and colloids.

Mixtures are the product of a mechanical blending or mixing of chemical substances like elements and compounds, without chemical bonding or other chemical change, so that each ingredient substance retains its own chemical properties and makeup. Nonetheless, despite there are no chemical changes to its constituents, the physical properties of a mixture, such as its melting point, may differ from those of the components. Some mixtures can be separated into their components by physical (mechanical or thermal) means. Azeotropes can be considered as a kind of mixture which usually pose considerable difficulties regarding the separation processes required to obtain their constituents (physical or chemical processes or, even a blend of them).

Mixtures can be either homogeneous or heterogeneous. A homogeneous mixture is a type of mixture in which the composition is uniform. A heterogeneous mixture is a type of mixture in which the composition can easily be identified, as there are two or more phases present. Air is a homogeneous mixture of the gaseous substances nitrogen, oxygen, and smaller amounts of other substances. Salt, sugar, and many other substances dissolve in water to form homogeneous mixtures. A homogeneous mixture in which there is both a solute and solvent present is also a solution.

The following table shows the main properties of the three families of mixtures.

The following table shows examples of the three types of mixtures.

Physics and Chemistry

A heterogeneous mixture is a mixture of two or more compounds. Examples are: mixtures of sand and water or sand and iron filings, a conglomerate rock, water and oil, a salad, trail mix, and concrete (not cement). Gy's sampling theory quantitatively defines the heterogeneity of a particle as:

h_i = \frac{(c_i - c_\text{batch})m_i}{c_\text{batch} m_\text{aver}} .

where h_i, c_i, c_\text{batch}, m_i, and m_\text{aver} are respectively: the heterogeneity of the ith particle of the population, the mass concentration of the property of interest in the ith particle of the population, the mass concentration of the property of interest in the population, the mass of the ith particle in the population, and the average mass of a particle in the population.

During the sampling of heterogeneous mixtures of particles, the variance of the sampling error is generally non-zero.

Pierre Gy derived, from the Poisson sampling model, the following formula for the variance of the sampling error in the mass concentration in a sample:

V = \frac{1}{(\sum_{i=1}^N q_i m_i)^2} \sum_{i=1}^N q_i(1-q_i) m_{i}^{2} \left(a_i - \frac{\sum_{j=1}^N q_j a_j m_j}{\sum_{j=1}^N q_j m_j}\right)^2 .

in which V is the variance of the sampling error, N is the number of particles in the population (before the sample was taken), q i is the probability of including the ith particle of the population in the sample (i.e. the first-order inclusion probability of the ith particle), m i is the mass of the ith particle of the population and a i is the mass concentration of the property of interest in the ith particle of the population.

It must be noted that the above equation for the variance of the sampling error is an approximation based on a linearization of the mass concentration in a sample.

In the theory of Gy, correct sampling is defined as a sampling scenario in which all particles have the same probability of being included in the sample. This implies that q i no longer depends on i, and can therefore be replaced by the symbol q. Gy's equation for the variance of the sampling error becomes:

V = \frac{1-q}{q M_\text{batch}^2} \sum_{i=1}^N m_{i}^{2} \left(a_i - a_\text{batch} \right)^2 .

where abatch is the concentration of the property of interest in the population from which the sample is to be drawn and Mbatch is the mass of the population from which the sample is to be drawn.



From Yahoo Answers

Question:I need help in my homework!!! Classifications for each of these please!!! 1.Salt 2.Block of Iron 3.Glass of Cola 4.Mercury in a thermometer 5.Ice 6.Vinegar and Oil 7.Copper wire 8.Earth's atmosphere, when dusty 9.Earth's atmosphere, when dust-free 10.Rust 11.Brass 12.Aluminum foil 13.Homogenized milk 14.Sugar 15.Sugar water 16.Sandy water 17.Neon gas in neon sign 18.Blood THANKS SO MUCHHHH! 9th Grade .....

Answers:1. compound (NaCl), pure substance 2. element, pure substance 3. mixture (homogeneous) 4. element, pure substance 5. compound (H2O), pure substance 6. mixture (heterogeneous) 7. element, pure substance 8. mixture (heterogeneous) 9. mixture (homogeneous) 10. mixture (iron oxides), heterogeneous 11. mixture (homogeneous) 12. element, pure substance 13. mixture, homogeneous 14. compound (sucrose), pure substance 15. mixture (homogeneous) 16. mixture (heterogeneous) 17. element, pure substance 18. mixture (heterogeneous)

Question:This is just my guess. Could you please correct me if I'm wrong. Compound, homogeneous mixture, or heterogeneous mixture: Soil: homogeneous mixture. Sugar water: homogeneous mixture. Rocky road icecream: heterogeneous mixture. Alcohol: compound. Pure air: homogeneous mixture.

Answers:Soil is heterogeneous (not all the parts are the same, and there are many different parts) everything else is right :)

Question:is air a element, compound or a mixture please provide evidence science homework :p

Answers:100% its a mixture of lots and lots of different gases! http://education.jlab.org/glossary/abund_atmos.html

Question:it is found that a piece of unidentified matter can be broken into simpler part by physical means. is this an example of a compound element or mixture ? how do you know ?

Answers:it is a MIXTURE... because a compound can't be broken into simpler units by any physical means...eg: water is a compound made up of H and O atoms, and you can't break it into Oxygen and Hydrogen using physical forces.. happy to help

From Youtube

Mixtures and Compounds :Learn the difference!

Mixtures :Teachzer.com - This video discusses the differences between mixtures and compounds. It also goes through the different methods in separating mixtures into the individual substances.