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Question:How can i teach children (Five year olds) about properties of Air? What will be the best experiment to carry out?

Answers:Class 1 : Make them realize there is something around them. When i think about how i should have been taught, i realized that it would have made it a lot more fun if i realized myself that i was surrounded by something in the first place and that space around me isn't void of matter (or things in kiddy terms :P). The way to slowly bring that about would be to make the kids stand in front of strong fans and make them wonder what's pushing them. Release a helium balloon and make them wonder what's pushing it up. And at the end of the class, just tell them to take a deep breath and ask them what they did. Class 2 : Bring a transparent balloon this time and ask them what's inside the balloon that would make the balloon so big. With that being introductory, ask them how often they cover themselves with a blanket. Then inform them that they are ALWAYS covered by a blanket (*Gasps from the Kids :P*) and start slowly moving into this wonderful surrounding. Through the course of the class, make them do different things like look at airplanes, or look at air conditioners and fireplaces. Bring about the questioning attitude in them. Class 3 : Slowly proceed with what air has and why we need air. Tell them why plants and little doggies need air. Tell them why a soccer ball needs air and why the whole world needs air. Don't dump it all on one day. Take about 5 days to bring about the concept of air in them, with each day intriguing them more and more. Give them simple homeworks like taking the help of their parents to build little paper airplanes or bringing balloons to class and simple little items. Whatever you do, don't just dump all the stuff on Oxygen and Nitrogen on them. That should wait for about 5 classes and even then, you should take it slowly, a gas a day. Hope that helps build up some future scientists :P Good luck and have fun teaching :)

Question:Without taking 3rd or 4th grade students out on a field trip to find their own fossils, how would you help them better understand that 1) fossil shells were originally part of a living organism and 2) they have been both preserved and changed by fossilization?

Answers:Compare calcium carbonate shells of a fossil to the shells of current snails or other living organisms. The best way to get all the 3rd and 4th graders interested will be showing an educational film about how fossils are created. The creatures die, get buried under sediment, compacted into rock, then uplifted and weathered out for us to find.

Question:I have a 13 yr. old with a learning disability (dsylexia and processing disorder) who is struggling with anything beyond addition and subtraction. We have spent hours on multiplication and I have used every game, computer program, rote learning tricks and drills to no avail. Yesterday, we spent 90 minutes on just the "6" table and today, it is all gone except for the zeros and ones. We have been working on multiplication for over 6 months and both of us have reached our breaking point. What I need now is sites that may offer techniques for teaching math to learning diabled kids or that explain how to approach the process. Thanks

Answers:I am a high school special needs math teacher, and I also have a 10 year old daughter on an IEP. I understand your frustration. It's tough to work on something for 90 minutes only to have it disappear. As far as websites are concerned, I'm afraid I can't offer anything beyond the basic, standard, "google it". As far as what you may be able to do, I'm going to list a few things (even though you may have already tried them, so if I repeat these, I apologise). 1. I know 13 is old, but I know Schoolhouse Rock was very good for my daughter, particularly because it broke down the visual into a verbal processing thing. The song "3,6,9...12,15,18, ...21, 24, 27...30" was great because it was broken down into nice chunks. This could help him with his 6's since he could just tap the left for the 3, the right for the 6, the left for the 9, the right for the 12, and realize that he only counts the right for his tables of six. 2. Maybe even working on "just the 6's" was too much. If he has 0 and 1, start there and mix in 2. Once he has that, try 0, 1, 2 and 3. It may take longer (and it may not be successful), but at least it may avoid some of that frustration. And maybe just go for 30 minutes instead of 90. 3. I tell my daughter and my students, "You may not be great mathematicians. I can live with that, but I do expect you to be great people." Appreciate your child for what he/she brings to the table and not what they are lacking. It may not help your mathematics, but if you can focus on that big picture, it may help your sanity. 4. A lack of calculation does not mean a lack of ability. I am friends with the chess club advisor, and some of his best players have been from my program. They don't necessarily calculate well, but they can analyze on different levels. Your child may be the same way. He may need the assistance of a calculator, but what he can accomplish once he has one may be tremendous. I don't know if I've shed any new light on what you are going through, but I do wish you and child well.

Question:I have a 13 yr. old with a learning disability (dsylexia and processing disorder) who is struggling with anything beyond addition and subtraction. We have spent hours on multiplication and I have used every game, computer program, rote learning tricks and drills to no avail. Yesterday, we spent 90 minutes on just the "6" table and today, it is all gone except for the zeros and ones. We have been working on multiplication for over 6 months and both of us have reached our breaking point. What I need now is sites that may offer techniques for teaching math to learning diabled kids or that explain how to approach the process. Thanks

Answers:If he's (she's?) a visual learner and enjoys gaming, you might try this: http://www.bigbrainz.com/index.php My daughter, who has multiple disabilities, does better with pictures than with numbers. Could you help by putting the problems in picture form? What about hands-on manipulatives? Get some counting chips, or ones, tens, 100's, and 1000's cubes/rods. Or some multi-link cubes? Or use M&M's, etc.

From Youtube

Math Basics : How to Teach Children the Times Tables :When teaching children the time tables, flash cards are arguably the most basic and effective way to do so. Help your children learn the time tables with advice from a collegiate math teacher in this free video on math basics.Expert: Jimmy Chang Bio: Jimmy Chang has a master's degree in math and has been a math teacher at St. Pete College for more than eight years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz Series Description: Math skills can be very helpful in our everyday lives. Practice these basic math tips from a collegiate math teacher in this free video series on math basics.

Reading Lessons for Children : How to Teach the Alphabet :A good way to start teaching kids to read is by teaching the alphabet and using alphabet charts and keeping them in their rooms; learn more readingtips in this free child-development video. Expert: Ann Kennedy Bio: Ann Marie Kennedy is a certified teacher who has successfully taught in and out of the classroom. Kennedy received a Teacher Recognition Award from The National Foundation of The Arts. Filmmaker: Reel Media LLC