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Plum pudding model

The plum pudding model of the atom by J. J. Thomson, who discovered the electron in 1897, was proposed in 1904 before the discovery of the atomic nucleus. In this model, the atom is composed of electrons (which Thomson still called "corpuscles", though G. J. Stoney had proposed that atoms of electricity be called electrons in 1894) surrounded by a soup of positive charge to balance the electrons' negative charges, like negatively-charged "plums" surrounded by positively-charged "pudding". The electrons (as we know them today) were thought to be positioned throughout the atom, but with many structures possible for positioning multiple electrons, particularly rotating rings of electrons (see below). Instead of a soup, the atom was also sometimes said to have had a "cloud" of positive charge.

With this model, Thomson abandoned his earlier "nebular atom" hypothesis in which the atom was composed of immaterial vorticies. Now, at least part of the atom was to be composed of Thomson's particulate negative corpuscles, although the rest of the positively-charged part of the atom remained somewhat nebulous and ill-defined.

The 1904 Thomson model was disproved by the 1909 gold foil experiment, which was interpreted by Ernest Rutherford in 1911 to imply a very small nucleus of the atom containing a very high positive charge (in the case of gold, enough to balance about 100 electrons), thus leading to the Rutherford model of the atom. Finally, after Henry Moseley's work showed in 1913 that the nuclear charge was very close to the atomic number, Antonius Van den Broek suggested that atomic number is nuclear charge. This work had culminated in the solar-system-like (but quantum-limited) Bohr model of the atom in the same year, in which a nucleus containing an atomic number of positive charge is surrounded by an equal number of electrons in orbital shells.

Thomson's model was compared (though not by Thomson) to a British dessert called plum pudding, hence the name. Thomson's paper was published in the March 1904 edition of the Philosophical Magazine, the leading British science journal of the day. In Thomson's view: ... the atoms of the elements consist of a number of negatively electrified corpuscles enclosed in a sphere of uniform positive electrification, ...

In this model, the electrons were free to rotate within the blob or cloud of positive substance. These orbits were stabilized in the model by the fact that when an electron moved farther from the center of the positive cloud, it felt a larger net positive inward force, because there was more material of opposite charge, inside its orbit (see Gauss's law). In Thomson's model, electrons were free to rotate in rings which were further stabilized by interactions between the electrons, and spectra were to be accounted for by energy differences of different ring orbits. Thomson attempted to make his model account for some of the major spectral lines known for some elements, but was not notably successful at this. Still, Thomson's model (along with a similar Saturnian ring model for atomic electrons, also put forward in 1904 by Nagaoka after James C. Maxwell's model of Saturn's rings), were earlier harbingers of the later and more successful solar-system-like Bohr model of the atom.


Atomic number

In chemistry and physics, the atomic number (also known as the proton number) is the number of protons found in the nucleus of an atom and therefore identical to the charge number of the nucleus. It is conventionally represented by the symbol Z. The atomic number uniquely identifies a chemical element. In an atom of neutral charge, the atomic number is also equal to the number of electrons.

The atomic number, Z, should not be confused with the mass number, A, which is the total number of protons and neutrons in the nucleus of an atom. The number of neutrons, N, is known as the neutron number of the atom; thus, A = Z + N. Since protons and neutrons have approximately the same mass (and the mass of the electrons is negligible for many purposes), the atomic mass of an atom is roughly equal to A.

Atoms having the same atomic number Z but different neutron number N, and hence different atomic mass, are known as isotopes. Most naturally occurring elements exist as a mixture of isotopes, and the average atomic mass of this mixture determines the element's atomic weight.

History

Loosely speaking, the existence of a periodic table creates an ordering for the elements. Such an ordering is not necessarily a numbering, but can be used to construct a numbering by fiat. Dmitri Mendeleev claimed he arranged his tables in order of atomic weight ("Atomgewicht") However, in deference to the observed chemical properties, he violated his own rule and placed tellurium (atomic weight 127.6) ahead of iodine (atomic weight 126.9). This placement is consistent with the modern practice of ordering the elements by proton number, Z, but this number was not known or suspected at the time.

A simple numbering based on periodic table position was never entirely satisfactory. Besides iodine and tellurium, several other pairs of elements (such as cobalt and nickel) were known to have nearly identical or reversed atomic weights, leaving their placement in the periodic table by chemical properties to be in violation of known physical properties. Another problem was that the gradual identification of more and more chemically similar and indistinguishable lanthanides, which were of an uncertain number, led to inconsistency and uncertainty in the numbering of all elements at least from lutetium (element 71) onwards (hafnium was not known at this time).

In 1911, Ernest Rutherford gave a model of the atom in which a central core held most of the atom's mass and a positive charge which, in units of the electron's charge, was to be approximately equal to half of the atom's atomic weight, expressed in numbers of hydrogen atoms. This central charge would thus be approximately half the atomic weight (though it was almost 25% off the figure for the atomic number in gold (Z = 79, A = 197), the single element from which Rutherford made his guess). Nevertheless, in spite of Rutherford's estimation that gold had a central charge of about 100 (but was element Z = 79 on the periodic table), a month after Rutherford's paper appeared, Antonius van den Broek first formally suggested that the central charge and number of electrons in an atom was exactly equal to its place in the periodic table (also known as element number, atomic number, and symbolized Z). This proved eventually to be the case.

The experimental situation improved dramatically after research by Henry Moseley in 1913. Moseley, after discussions with Bohr who was at the same lab (and who had used Van den Broek's hypothesis in his Bohr model of the atom), decided to test Van den Broek and Bohr's hypothesis directly, by seeing if spectral lines emitted from excited atoms fit the Bohr theory's demand that the frequency of the spectral lines be proportional to a measure of the square of Z.

To do this, Moseley measured the wavelengths of the innermost photon transitions (K and L lines) produced by the elements from aluminum (Z = 13) to gold (Z = 79) used as a series of movable anodic targets inside an x-ray tube. The square root of the frequency of these photons (x-rays) increased from one target to the next in a linear fashion. This led to the conclusion (Moseley's law) that the atomic number does closely correspond (with an offset of one unit for K-lines, in Moseley's work) to the calculated electric charge of the nucleus, i.e. the proton number Z. Among other things, Moseley demonstrated that the lanthanide series (from lanthanum to lutetium inclusive) must have 15 members—no fewer and no more—which was far from obvious from the chemistry at that time.

The conventional symbol Z presumably comes from the German word (atomic number).

Chemical properties

Each element has a specific set of chemical properties as a consequence of the number of electrons present in the neutral atom, which is Z. The configuration of these electrons follows from the principles of quantum mechanics. The number of electrons in each element's ele

Beta particle

Beta particles are high-energy, high-speed electrons or positrons emitted by certain types of radioactivenuclei such as potassium-40. The beta particles emitted are a form of ionizing radiation also known as beta rays. The production of beta particles is termed beta decay. They are designated by the Greek letter beta (β). There are two forms of beta decay, β− and β+, which respectively give rise to the electron and the positron.

β− decay (electron emission)

An unstable atomic nucleus with an excess of neutrons may undergo β− decay, where a neutron is converted into a proton, an electron and an electron-type antineutrino (the antiparticle of the neutrino):

→ + +

This process is mediated by the weak interaction. The neutron turns into a proton through the emission of a virtualW− boson. At the quark level, W− emission turns a down-type quark into an up-type quark, turning a neutron (one up quark and two down quarks) into a proton (two up quarks and one down quark). The virtual W− boson then decays into an electron and an antineutrino.

Beta decay commonly occurs among the neutron-rich fission byproducts produced in nuclear reactors. Free neutrons also decay via this process. This is the source of the copious amount of electron antineutrinos produced by fission reactors.

β+ decay (positron emission)

Unstable atomic nuclei with an excess of protons may undergo β+ decay, also called positron decay, where a proton is converted into a neutron, a positron and an electron-type neutrino:

→ + +

Beta plus decay can only happen inside nuclei when the absolute value of the binding energy of the daughter nucleus is higher than that of the mother nucleus.

Interaction with other matter

Of the three common types of radiation given off by radioactive materials, alpha, beta and gamma, beta has the medium penetrating power and the medium ionising power. Although the beta particles given off by different radioactive materials vary in energy, most beta particles can be stopped by a few millimeters of aluminum. Being composed of charged particles, beta radiation is more strongly ionising than gamma radiation. When passing through matter, a beta particle is decelerated by electromagnetic interactions and may give off bremsstrahlungx-rays.

Uses

Beta particles can be used to treat health conditions such as eye and bone cancer, and are also used as tracers. Strontium-90 is the material most commonly used to produce beta particles. Beta particles are also used in quality control to test the thickness of an item, such as paper, coming through a system of rollers. Some of the beta radiation is absorbed while passing through the product. If the product is made too thick or thin, a correspondingly different amount of radiation will be absorbed. A computer program monitoring the quality of the manufactured paper will then move the rollers to change the thickness of the final product. The well-known 'betalight' contains tritium and a phosphor.

Beta plus(or positron) decay of a radioactivetracerisotope is the source of the positrons used in positron emission tomography (PET scan).

History

Henri Becquerel, while experimenting with fluorescence, accidentally found out that Uranium exposed a black paper wrapped photographic plate with some unknown radiation that could not be turned off like X-rays. Ernest Rutherford continued these experiments and discovered two different kinds of radiation:

  • alpha particles that did not show up on the Becquerel plates because they were easily absorbed by the black wrapping paper
  • beta particles which are 100 times more penetrating than alpha particles.

He published his results in 1897.

Health

Beta particles are able to penetrate living matter to a certain extent and can change the structure of struck molecules. In most cases such change can be considered as damage with results possibly as severe as cancer and death. If the struck molecule is DNA it can show a spontaneous mutation.

Beta sources can be used in radiation therapy to kill cancer cells.

Future use

One can envisage betavoltaic cells to supply p

Joseph Larmor

Sir Joseph Larmor (11 July 1857 Magheragall, County Antrim, Ireland– 19 May 1942 Holywood, County Down, Northern Ireland ), a physicist and mathematician who made innovations in the understanding of electricity, dynamics, thermodynamics, and the electron theory of matter. His most influential work was Aether and Matter, a theoretical physics book published in 1900.

Biography

He grew up in Belfast, the son of a shopkeeper. He was a student at Royal Belfast Academical Institution, Queen's University Belfast, and St John's College, Cambridge where he was Senior Wrangler. After teaching physics for a few years at Queen's College, Galway, he accepted a lectureship in mathematics at Cambridge in 1885. In 1903 he was appointed Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge, a post he retained until his retirement in 1932. He never married.

Larmor proposed that the aether could be represented as a homogeneousfluidmedium which was perfectly incompressible and elastic. Larmor believed the aether was separate from matter. He united Lord Kelvin's model of spinning gyrostats (e.g., vortexes) with this theory.

Parallel to the development of Lorentz ether theory, Larmor published the Lorentz transformations in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Societyin 1897 some two years beforeHendrik Lorentz (1899, 1904) and eight years before Albert Einstein (1905). Larmor however did not possess the correct velocity transformations, which include the addition of velocities law, which were later discovered by Henri Poincaré. Larmor predicted the phenomenon of time dilation, at least for orbiting electrons, and verified that the FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction (length contraction) should occur for bodies whose atoms were held together by electromagnetic forces. In his book Aether and Matter (1900), he again presented the Lorentz transformations, time dilation and length contraction (treating these as dynamic rather than kinematic effects). Larmor opposed Albert Einstein's theory of relativity (though he supported it for a short time). Larmor rejected both the curvature of space and the special theory of relativity, to the extent that he claimed that an absolute time was essential to astronomy (Larmor 1924, 1927).

Larmor held that matter consisted of particles moving in the aether. Larmor believed the source of electric charge was a "particle" (which as early as 1894 he was referring to as the electron). Thus, in what was apparently the first specific prediction of time dilation, he wrote "... individual electrons describe corresponding parts of their orbits in times shorter for the [rest] system in the ratio (1 - v2/c2)1/2" (Larmor 1897).

Larmor held that the flow of charged particles constitutes the current of conduction (but was not part of the atom). Larmor calculated the rate of energyradiation from an accelerating electron. Larmor explained the splitting of the spectral lines in a magnetic field by the oscillation of electrons.

In 1919, Larmor proposed sunspots are self-regenerativedynamo action on the Sun's surface.

Motivated by his strong opposition to From Encyclopedia

Atomic Structure Atomic Structure

The ancient Greek philosophers Leucippus and Democritus believed that atoms existed, but they had no idea as to their nature. Centuries later, in 1803, the English chemist John Dalton, guided by the experimental fact that chemical elements cannot be decomposed chemically, was led to formulate his atomic theory. Dalton's atomic theory was based on the assumption that atoms are tiny indivisible entities, with each chemical element consisting of its own characteristic atoms.✶ ✶See Atoms article for further discussion of Dalton's atomic theory. The atom is now known to consist of three primary particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons, which make up the atoms of all matter. A series of experimental facts established the validity of the model. Radioactivity played an important part. Marie Curie suggested, in 1899, that when atoms disintegrate, they contradict Dalton's idea that atoms are indivisible. There must then be something smaller than the atom (subatomic particles) of which atoms were composed. Long before that, Michael Faraday's electrolysis experiments and laws suggested that, just as an atom is the fundamental particle of an element, a fundamental particle for electricity must exist. The "particle" of electricity was given the name electron. Experiments with cathode-ray tubes, conducted by the British physicist Joseph John Thomson, proved the existence of the electron and obtained the charge-to-mass ratio for it. The experiments suggested that electrons are present in all kinds of matter and that they presumably exist in all atoms of all elements. Efforts were then turned to measuring the charge on the electron, and these were eventually successful by the American physicist Robert Andrews Millikan through the famous oil drop experiment. The study of the so-called canal rays by the German physicist Eugen Goldstein, observed in a special cathode-ray tube with a perforated cathode, let to the recognition in 1902 that these rays were positively charged particles (protons ). Finally, years later in 1932 the British physicist James Chadwick discovered another particle in the nucleus that had no charge, and for this reason was named neutron. As a physical chemist, George Stoney made significant contributions to our understanding of molecular motion. However, this Irish scientist is better known for assigning a name to negative atomic charges, electrons, while addressing the Royal Society of Dublin in 1891. —Valerie Borek Joseph John Thomson had supposed that an atom was a uniform sphere of positively charged matter within which electrons were circulating (the "plum-pudding" model). Then, around the year 1910, Ernest Ruthorford (who had discovered earlier that alpha rays consisted of positively charged particles having the mass of helium atoms) was led to the following model for the atom: Protons and neutrons exist in a very small nucleus, which means that the tiny nucleus contains all the positive charge and most of the mass of the atom, while negatively charged electrons surround the nucleus and occupy most of the volume of the atom. In formulating his model, Rutherford was assisted by Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden, who found that when alpha particles hit a thin gold foil, almost all passed straight through, but very few (only 1 in 20,000) were deflected at large angles, with some coming straight back. Rutherford remarked later that it was as if you fired a 15-inch artillery shell at a sheet of paper and it bounced back and hit you. The deflected particles suggested that the atom has a very tiny nucleus that is extremely dense and positive in charge. Also working with Rutherford was Henry G. J. Moseley who, in 1913, performed an important experiment. When various metals were bombarded with electrons in a cathode-ray tube, they emitted X rays, the wavelengths of which were related to the nuclear charge of the metal atoms. This led to the law of chemical periodicity, which provided refinement of the periodic table introduced by Mendeleev in 1869. According to this law, all atoms of an element have the same number of protons in the nucleus. It is called the atomic number and is given the symbol Z. Hydrogen is the simplest element and has Z = 1. Through Rutherford's work it was known that that electrons are arranged in the space surrounding the atomic nucleus. A planetary model of the atom, with the electrons moving in circular orbits around the nucleus seemed an acceptable model. However, such a "dynamic model" violated the laws of classical electrodynamics, according to which a charged particle, such as an electron, moving in the positive electric field of the nucleus, should lose energy by radiation and eventually spiral into the nucleus. To solve this contradiction, in 1913, the Danish physicist Neils Bohr (then studying under Rutherford) postulated that the electron orbiting the nucleus could move only in certain orbits, having in each a certain "quantized" energy. It turns out that the colors in fireworks would help prove him right. The colorful lights of fireworks are emitted by "excited" atoms; that is, by atoms that have absorbed extra energy. Light consists of electromagnetic waves, each (monochromatic) color with a characteristic wavelength λ and frequency v. Frequency is related to energy E through the famous Planck equation, E = hν, where h is Planck's constant (6.6256 x 10−34 J s). Note that white light, such as sunlight, is a mixture of light of all colors, so it does not have a characteristic wavelength. For this reason we say that white light has a "continuous spectrum." On the other hand, excited atoms emit a "line spectrum" consisting of a set of monochromatic visible radiations. Each element has a characteristic line spectrum that can be used to identify the element. Note that line emission spectra can also be obtained by heating a salt of a metal with a flame. For instance, common salt (sodium chloride) provides a strong yellow light to the flame coming from excited sodium, while copper salts emit a blue-green light and lithium salts a red light. The colors of fireworks are due to this phenomenon. Scientists in the late nineteenth century tried to quantify the line spectra of the elements. In 1885 the Swedish school teacher Johann Balmer discovered a series of lines in the visible spectrum of hydrogen, the wavelengths of which could be related with a simple equation: in which λ is wavelength, k is constant, a = 2, and b = 3, 4, 5, … This group of lines was called the Balmer series. For the red line b = 3, for the green line b = 4, and for the blue line b = 5. Similar series were further discovered: in the infrared region, the Paschen series (with a = 3 and b = 4, 5 … in the above equation), and much later in the ultraviolet region, the Lyman series (with a = 1 and b = 2, 3 …). In 1896 the Swedish spectroscopist Johannes Rydberg developed a general equation that allowed the calculation of the wavelength of the red, green, and blue lines in the atomic spectrum of hydrogen: where nL is the number of the lower energy level to which an electron falls and nH is the number of the higher energy level from which it falls. R is called the Rydberg constant (1.0974 x 10−7 m−1). R was later shown to be 2π 2me 4Z2/h 3c, where m is the mass of the electron, e is its charge, Z is the atomic number, h is Planck's constant, and c is the speed of light. As noted earlier, Bohr had suggested the quantization of Ruthford's model of the atom. Although he was not aware of the work of Balmer and Paschen when he wrote the first version of his 1913 article, he had incorporated Planck's constant h into his model, which turned out to be an important decision. Bohr assumed that the absorption or emission of radiation can occur only by "jumps" of the electron from one stationary orbit to another. (See Figure 1.) The energy differences between two such allowed orbits then provided the characteristic frequencies of the emitted light. ΔE = E n1 − E n2 = hν Planck's constant h was named by Bohr the "quantum of action." Bohr's theory was in close agreement with many experimental facts regarding one-electron atoms (the hydrogen


From Yahoo Answers

Question:I have to fill this out before Monday, and the website our teacher gave us to do so does not exist. I have found most of the answers via google, I was hoping someone could help me with these. 6) __________ decay is the breaking up of a radioactive element, more often than not resulting in the formation of a new nucleus. 7) _________________ is the changing of an atom into another kind of atom that takes place during radioactive decay. 8) In the year __________, Henri Becquerel of __________ discovered radioactivity. 9) Alpha radiation is actually a stream of (positively, negatively) charged particles. 10) Beta radiation is actually a stream of (positively, negatively) charged particles. 11) Whenever an element undergoes (alpha, beta, gamma) decay, it turns into another element with an atomic number two less than before and a mass number four less than before. 12) During (alpha, beta, gamma) decay, a neutron in the nucleus decays into a proton, an electron, and a neutrino. 13) The more stable a nucleus is, the (longer, shorter) its half-life. 17) (Alpha particles, Beta particles, Gamma rays) travel at the speed of light. 18) The term radioactivity was coined by __________. 19) (Alpha particles, Beta particles, Gamma rays) are not affected by a magnetic field because they carry no __________ charge. 20) An alpha particle is actually a nucleus of __________. 21) Beta particles originate in the __________ of the atom. 23) The half-life of a given isotope can be altered by heat, pressure, or some other physical means. True or False.

Answers:6) radioactive 7) ? (decay) 8) 1896, Paris 9) positively 10) negatively 11) alpha 12) beta 13) longer 17) gamma rays 18) Marie Sk odowska Curie 19) gamma rays, electrical 20) Helium (He) 21) nucleus 23) false

Question:THIS WILL EXPLAIN HOW WE CAN SAVE ON GAS A MAJOR ISSUE NOW, AND WORLD HUNGER CAN STOP AND MEDICINE SHOULD BE MADE AND THE CONFLICT W/ ALCHOL AND TOBACOO COMPANIES, PLZ READ AND REPLY , SERIOUS ANSEWERS , ONLY ANSEWER IF YOU READ , THX READ THIS IF YOU WANT TO KNOW THE TRUTH ABOUT WEED!! (i know it s long but its good information) The Marijuana Conspiracy THE REAL REASON HEMP IS ILLEGAL by Doug Yurchey And I will raise up for them a plant of renown, and they shall be no more consumed with hunger in the land. Ezekiel 34/29 The real reason Cannabis has been outlawed has nothing to do with its effects on the mind and body. MARIJUANA is DANGEROUS. Pot is NOT harmful to the human body or mind. Marijuana does NOT pose a threat to the general public. Marijuana is very much a danger to the oil companies, alcohol, tobacco industries and a large number of chemical corporations. Various big businesses, with plenty of dollars and influence, have suppressed the truth from the people. The truth is if marijuana was utilized for its vast array of commercial products, it would create an industrial atomic bomb! Entrepreneurs have not been educated on the product potential of pot. The super rich have conspired to spread misinformation about an extremely versatile plant that, if used properly, would ruin their companies. Where did the word 'marijuana' come from? In the mid 1930s, the M-word was created to tarnish the good image and phenomenal history of the hemp plant...as you will read. The facts cited here, with references, are generally verifiable in the Encyclopedia Britannica which was printed on hemp paper for 150 years: * All schoolbooks were made from hemp or flax paper until the 1880s; Hemp Paper Reconsidered, Jack Frazier, 1974. * It was LEGAL TO PAY TAXES WITH HEMP in America from 1631 until the early 1800s; LA Times, Aug. 12, 1981. * REFUSING TO GROW HEMP in America during the 17th and 18th Centuries WAS AGAINST THE LAW! You could be jailed in Virginia for refusing to grow hemp from 1763 to 1769; Hemp in Colonial Virginia, G. M. Herdon. * George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and other founding fathers GREW HEMP; Washington and Jefferson Diaries. Jefferson smuggled hemp seeds from China to France then to America. * Benjamin Franklin owned one of the first paper mills in America and it processed hemp. Also, the War of 1812 was fought over hemp. Napoleon wanted to cut off Moscow s export to England; Emperor Wears No Clothes, Jack Herer. * For thousands of years, 90f all ships' sails and rope were made from hemp. The word 'canvas' is Dutch for cannabis; Webster s New World Dictionary. * 80f all textiles, fabrics, clothes, linen, drapes, bed sheets, etc. were made from hemp until the 1820s with the introduction of the cotton gin. * The first Bibles, maps, charts, Betsy Ross s flag, the first drafts of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were made from hemp; U.S. Government Archives. * The first crop grown in many states was hemp. 1850 was a peak year for Kentucky producing 40,000 tons. Hemp was the largest cash crop until the 20th Century; State Archives. * Oldest known records of hemp farming go back 5000 years in China, although hemp industrialization probably goes back to ancient Egypt. * Rembrants, Gainsboroughs, Van Goghs as well as most early canvas paintings were principally painted on hemp linen. * In 1916, the U.S. Government predicted that by the 1940s all paper would come from hemp and that no more trees need to be cut down. Government studies report that 1 acre of hemp equals 4.1 acres of trees. Plans were in the works to implement such programs; Department of Agriculture * Quality paints and varnishes were made from hemp seed oil until 1937. 58,000 tons of hemp seeds were used in America for paint products in 1935; Sherman Williams Paint Co. testimony before Congress against the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act. * Henry Ford s first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the CAR ITSELF WAS CONTRUCTED FROM HEMP! On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, 'grown from the soil,' had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10 times stronger than steel; Popular Mechanics, 1941. * Hemp called 'Billion Dollar Crop.' It was the first time a cash crop had a business potential to exceed a billion dollars; Popular Mechanics, Feb., 1938. * Mechanical Engineering Magazine (Feb. 1938) published an article entitled 'The Most Profitable and Desirable Crop that Can be Grown.' It stated that if hemp was cultivated using 20th Century technology, it would be the single largest agricultural crop in the U.S. and the rest of the world. The following information comes directly from the United States Department of Agriculture s 1942 14-minute film encouraging and instructing 'patriotic American farmers' to grow 350,000 acres of hemp each year for the war effort: '...(When) Grecian temples were new, hemp was already old in the service of mankind. For thousands of years, even then, this plant had been grown for cordage and cloth in China and elsewhere in the East. For centuries prior to about 1850, all the ships that sailed the western seas were rigged with hempen rope and sails. For the sailor, no less than the hangman, hemp was indispensable... ...Now with Philippine and East Indian sources of hemp in the hands of the Japanese...American hemp must meet the needs of our Army and Navy as well as of our industries... ...the Navy s rapidly dwindling reserves. When that is gone, American hemp will go on duty again; hemp for mooring ships; hemp for tow lines; hemp for tackle and gear; hemp for countless naval uses both on ship and shore. Just as in the days when Old Ironsides sailed the seas victorious with her hempen shrouds and hempen sails. Hemp for victory!' Certified proof from the Library of Congress; found by the research of Jack Herer, refuting claims of other government agencies that the 1942 USDA film 'Hemp for Victory' did not exist. Hemp cultivation and production do not harm the environment. The USDA Bulletin ..404 concluded that hemp produces 4 times as much pulp with at least 4 to 7 times less pollution. From Popular Mechanics, Feb. 1938: 'It has a short growing season...It can be grown in any state...The long roots penetrate and break the soil to leave it in perfect condition for the next year s crop. The dense shock of leaves, 8 to 12 feet above the ground, chokes out weeds. ...hemp, this new crop can add immeasurably to American agriculture and industry.' In the 1930s, innovations in farm machinery would have caused an industrial revolution when applied to hemp. This single resource could have created millions of new jobs generating thousands of quality products. Hemp, if not made illegal, would have brought America out of the Great Depression. William Randolph Hearst (Citizen Kane) and the Hearst Paper Manufacturing Division of Kimberly Clark owned vast acreage of timberlands. The Hearst Company supplied most paper products. Patty Hearst s grandfather, a destroyer of nature for his own personal profit, stood to lose billions because of hemp. In 1937, Dupont patented the processes to make plastics from oil and coal. Dupont s Annual Report urged stockholders to invest in its new petrochemical division. Synthetics such as plastics, cellophane, celluloid, methanol, nylon, rayon, Dacron, etc., could now be made from oil. Natural hemp industrialization would have ruined over 80f Dupont s business. THE CONSPIRACY Andrew Mellon became Hoover s Secretary of the Treasury and Dupont s primary investor. He appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J. Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. Secret meetings were held by these financial tycoons. Hemp was declared dangerous and a threat to their billion dollar enterprises. For their dynasties to remain intact, hemp had to go. These men took an obscure Mexican slang word: 'marihuana' and pushed it into t

Answers:Yes it should be legalised. That is my personal opinion. I enjoy cannabis daily and have done for 15 years. There are many arguaments for and against but ultimately i don't think the fact that it is illegal has much effect on most people. Some say it is a gateway drug and leads on to harder drugs, well if that is true the main reason is because alot of people have to go to a drug dealer to buy it, therefore coming in to contact with other drugs and being put in a position where they will be offered something else. Personally i think alcohol is a far more dangerous and damaging drug than cannabis. Alcohol puts enormous strain on the police and nhs services, costs the country untold amounts of money, before you even consider the price the families of alcoholics have to pay. Alcohol impairs judgement and in general makes people more aggressive and violent, Cannabis on the other hand has the opposite effect, making people more calm and relaxed. I too have seen Reefer Madness and cannot believe that people were supposed to believe that rubbish, it makes you wonder how many other lies people swallow under the banner of 'information'. Anyone who has smoked cannabis or knows anyone that has will easily be able to see that this film is far from the truth, and is laughable. The trouble is most people do believe what they are told because they are too lazy to find out about things for themselves. I think it is a crying shame that the world is denied all the positive things that could come from this plant because of money and control.

Question:Can you please help me with my homework. Can you tell me at least 50 words on one important event in America for each decade(1890-1990). If you do ill also put you on my contacts (IV NEVER PUT ANYONE ON MY CONTACTS). So this will show how much you would help me. PLEASE FINISH DENNIS C

Answers:1890- The Spanish American War starts in 1898 and America defeats Spain. The Uss Maine explodes off the Cuba coast, and America blames Spain. It conducts a brief war with Spain. Spain lost most of its fleet and America gained the terrirories of the Philippines, Guam, and Pueroto Rico. The U.S. still controls the latter two. Boring decade. 1900s- A very good decade as the Panama Canal is built by the U.S. (idk if it counts, but use the wright brothers if this isnt american enuff) This canal connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. It took the whole decade, but when it was complete, it gave the U.S. an undeniable advantage for its Navy and trading ships as it cut travel time by weeks. Helped America in both World Wars. 1910- As World War One was going on, Henry Ford was making millions of "Tin Lizzys, or Model T's. This was the first mass produced car using an assembly line, and made the car something that almost every family had. Secured the place of the car in the American family. Now everybody drove. 1920- Times were good as an economic boom was taking place, but the Stock Market crashed in 1928. As a result of overinvesting with America's new found wealth, almost all Americans were affected, as unemployment rates soared with poverty. Lasted until the 1930s. (Add a couple more words) 1930- Franklin Roosevelt is elected President in 1932. He serves for 12 years until 1945, when he died. He created the New Deal, which helped America get out of the Depression. The New Deal used government spending to get rid of poverty and make the U.S. a legitimate, strong nation. 1940- The first Atomic bomb is tested in New Mexico in 1945. This relatively small device paved the way for nuclear weapons and its use on Japan to end the Second World War. This also paved the way for nuclear power and made the U.S. a country to be reckoned up until today. Theres the first half. I would do more, but im tired. If its due later this week, ill finish tomorrow. gl

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Periodic Table Of Elements :He realized that the table in front of him lay at the very heart of chemistry. In his table he noted gaps - spaces where elements should be but none had yet been discovered. In fact, just as Adams and Le Verrier could be said to have discovered the planet Neptune on paper, Mendeleev could be said to have discovered germanium (which he called eka-silicon because he observed a gap between silicon and tin), gallium (eka-aluminum) and scandium (eka-boron) on paper, for he predicted their existence and their properties before their actual discoveries. Although Mendeleev had made a crucial breakthrough, he made little further progress because the Rutherford-Bohr model of the atom had not yet been formulated. In 1913, Henry Moseley, who worked with Rutherford, showed it is atomic number (charge) and not (as Mendeleev had proposed) atomic weight that is most fundamental to the chemical properties of any element. Like Mendeleev, Moseley was able to predict correctly the existence of new elements based on his work. And today the elements are still arranged in order of increasing atomic number (Z) as you go from left to right across the table. We call the horizontal rows periods and the vertical rows groups. We also know an element's chemistry is determined by the way its electrons are arranged - its electron configuration.

Joseph George, Researcher & Author, New Physics, ISBN-10: 1456424211 :Latest Book Published: Structure of Atom: The Space Inside of an Atom is Not Empty. (amazon.com) ISBN-13: 978-1456424213 ISBN-10: 1456424211 List of articles published on the Internet: Please visit : physics-edu.org From 2001 to 2006 ( www.geocities.com/newideasfromtelewise/) 1) What is light? (January 2001) 2) Nuclear energy (January 2001) 3) Chemical energy 4) Structure of atom Exploring nuclear energy: www.google.com (year 2003) New website- From 10- June- 2006 ( www.physics-edu.org ) 1) What is light? 2) Electric field and magnetic field 3) Structure of atom 4) Nuclear energy 5) Chemical energy Dr. Tejman Chaim Henrys website referring my atom model www.grandunifiedtheory.org.il Prof. Umberto Bartoccis website referring my article what is light www.cartesio-episteme.net List of e-books published on the Internet STRUCTURE OF ATOM www.ebookmall.com www.ebookmall.com New Physics (5- February- 2007) physics-edu.org The 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics Abstract acceptance (University of Western Australia, Perth) 1) Structure of atom, 2) Exploring the magnetic resistance, 3) What is radio wave?, 4) Nuclear reactions and releasing of energy physics-edu.org physics-edu.org List of seminars/ workshops that I have participated Workshop on Inventors of India: Knowledge Network for Incubating Innovations into Enterprises held at Ahemedabad from September 24 -26, 2004 (IIMA) LIST PARTICIPANTS WORKSHOP INVENTORS INDIA List of technology ideas that I ...