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From Yahoo Answers

Question:When taking the Ged are you given a formula chart for the math and science sections? Do I need to memorize the formula's or will they give me a chart with the formula's on it?

Answers:Yes, the math section comes with a list of formulas such as the area of a square, circle, etc. But you should try to have them memorized anyway. Although I was surprised when I took the test that most of the formulas you don't use at all. I don't think the science section had a formula chart. I can't think of what formulas science would have.

Question:Im wondering if any of you guys can give me advice about a current issue i'm having. I'm placed in a low remedial math class, its basically pre-algebra. I took a accuplacer test and did not score well. so now im a math class that reviews long division, multplying and fractions and such and basic algebra questions I feel like i got completely fucked on though, the accuplacer test i took was testing me on things like polynominals, functions and some stuff i had no clue how to do, i was able to do the functions/polynominals. I've never been great in math but in high school i took pre algebra, geometry and algebra 2 with a intro to pre calc class that was just more advanced algebra class. if i was able to use my TI calculator on the accuplacer test or if it actually tested me on things I learned in the past two years i would of been fine, but it was asking me problems i had zero idea how to do. im just really angry because i now have to pay money for someone to teach me how to do long division and basic algebra equations and then after this i will have to take a intermediate algebra class. is there anything i can do besides stick it out?

Answers:Go online and check for "free math questions" find a good site and practice

Question:?????????+-?????????

Answers:No formula sheet, though more than likely, you won't have to calculate anything that requires some obscure, rarely used formula unless they give it to you in the problem.

Question:I have been out of college for 6 years and am just now going back to school. I had to take a college level math placement test and didn't do so well. One of the questions was something like "how many radians are in an angle of 18 degrees?" I was just on wikipedia looking at equivalents and it says that 180 degrees = pi. So is 18 degrees pi/10? Is this all a matter of memorization? Or is there an easy way to calculate these things? These placement tests are no calculators.

Answers:Math is mostly considered by how good you are at logic, but you must also be good as memorizing formulas. To get Radians from degrees you will use this formula: Radians=(Angle*Pi)/180, So if you put 18 in for the angle you will end up with (18*Pi)/180 Simplify that and you can get 18 to equal 1 and 180 to equal 10. So it is (1*Pi)/10. Which the 1 is understood so it would be Pi/10. To get degrees from radians you use this formula: Degrees=(Radians)*(180/Pi) So if you put Pi/18 in there you will get (Pi/10)*(180/Pi) You can then cross out the Pi's and you will be left with (1/10)*(180/1) which is (180/10) which is 18.

From Youtube

College Algebra: Decoding the Circle Formula :watch full lesson here: www.mindbites.com This lesson is part of a series: College Algebra In this lesson, you will learn how to find the (x, y) coordinates for the center of a circle graphed on the Cartesian coordinate system as well as the the radius of the circle from a formula or expression that doesnt easily lend itself to the standard circle formula (eg r^2 = (xh)^2+(yk)^2)). To do this, you'll generally use a math technique called, Completing the Square. Taught by Professor Edward Burger, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive course, College Algebra. This course and others are available from Thinkwell, Inc. The full course can be found at www.thinkwell.com The full course covers equations and inequalities, relations and functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, conic sections and a variety of other AP algebra, advanced algebra and Algebra II topics.

College Algebra: Distance Modulus Formula :www.mindbites.com Taught by Professor Edward Burger, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive course, College Algebra. This course and others are available from Thinkwell, Inc. The full course can be found atwww.thinkwell.com The full course covers equations and inequalities, relations and functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, conic sections and a variety of other AP algebra, advanced algebra and Algebra II topics. Edward Burger, Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, earned his Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin, having graduated summa cum laude with distinction in mathematics from Connecticut College. He has also taught at UT-Austin and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and he served as a fellow at the University of Waterloo in Canada and at Macquarie University in Australia. Prof. Burger has won many awards, including the 2001 Haimo Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics, the 2004 Chauvenet Prize, and the 2006 Lester R. Ford Award, all from the Mathematical Association of America. In 2006, Reader's Digest named him in the "100 Best of America". Prof. Burger is the author of over 50 articles, videos, and books, including the trade book, Coincidences, Chaos, and All That Math Jazz: Making Light of Weighty Ideas and of the textbook The Heart of Mathematics: An Invitation to Effective Thinking. He also speaks frequently to professional and public audiences ...