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From Wikipedia

Loose sentence

A loose sentence is a type of sentence in which the main idea (independent clause) comes first, followed by dependent grammatical units such as phrases and clauses. The meaning of a loose sentence can be easily understood in the very beginning of the sentence, unlike a periodic sentence where the subject-verb of the base sentence is completed at the end.

It adds modifying elements after the subject, complement, and verb.

Loose sentences may make a work seem informal, relaxed, and conversational. However, according to Strunk and White's The Elements of Style(2000), a succession of loose sentences, especially those of two clauses, is to be avoided because of "mechanical symmetry and sing-song".

Examples

  • He went into town to buy groceries, to visit his friends, and to go to the bookstore.
  • "Bells rang, filling the air with their clangor, startling pigeons into flight from every belfry, bringing people into the streets to hear the news." (From the English Reviewer)
  • She drove her car to go to the movie, and get gas.

Complex sentence

A complex sentence is a sentence with one independent clause and at least one dependent clause.

Contrast

  • I ate the meal that you cooked.

I ate the meal is an independent clause and that you cooked is a relative clause.

More examples of a complex sentence are:

I enjoyed that apple pie that you bought for me.

I like the pomegranate juice that my father poured into the cup.

  • I was scared, but I didn't run away.

Both clauses are independent. Therefore, this is a compound sentence but not a complex sentence.

  • The dog that you gave me barked at me, and it bit my hand.

This is a compound-complex sentence with two independent clauses (The dog that you gave me barked at me and The dog that you gave me bit my hand) and one dependent clause (that you gave me).



From Yahoo Answers

Question:Is this an example of a compound sentence? I wanted to buy the red sweater but they sold the last one of Friday. is it an example of a compound sentence? if it is can you tell me what the subject, verb and FANBOYS is? i think the FANBOYS is BUT whats the subject and verb then? thanks xo

Answers:It is a compound sentence. Thus there are two subjects and two verbs. For the first part, I is the subject and WANTED is the verb. In the second part, THEY is the subject and SOLD is the verb.

Question:I wanted to buy the red sweater but they sold the last one of Friday. is it an example of a compound sentence? if it is can you tell me what the subject, verb and FANBOYS is? i think the FANBOYS is BUT whats the subject and verb then? thanks xo

Answers:Yes, it is a compound sentence. it is composed of two independent clauses: 1. I WANTED to buy the red sweater 2. THEY SOLD the last one on Friday there are two subjects and two verbs (one subject and verb per clause). subjects are the ones doing something. I is the subject of the first clause THEY is the subject of the second clause verbs is the actual DOING part. WANTED is the verb of the first clause SOLD is the verb of the second clause but is the FANBOY, actually called a "conjunction" the term FANBOY is just used to help identify conjunctions. good luck!

Question:There was this website that I found a little while ago on the internet; but for the life of me I cannot remember the website address. It allowed you to update and write sample definitions and easy sentences. It worked somehow similar to wikpedia.

Answers:Dictionary.com

Question:i need a little help on homework i need at least 6 sentences with adverbs can u please help me out. also is.... enough, how, why, hopefully, and surprisingly an adverb?

Answers:Adverbs help the action word (the verb) by telling how, when or where the action takes place here are some adverbs: accidentally (how) afterwards (when) almost (how) they are the first adverbs on the great website of 144 adverbs listed as my source 3 of your words are adverbs and now you know how to tell which ones.

From Youtube

Interrogative, Declarative, Imperative and Exclamatory Sentences :englishcafe.com - In the latest episode of "Learn English with Jim," Jim explores the four types of sentences in the English language - Declarative, Exclamatory, Imperative and Interrogative.

ENG 402: Exclamatory Sentences (chapter 4 lecture) :Video version of my "Exclamatory Sentences" lecture for my English 402--Grammar course at the State University of New York College at Cortland.