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domain and range of ordered pairs

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Question:Given the set of ordered pairs {(2, 2), (5, 2), (7, 5), (5, 5)}, determine the domain and range and state if the set is a function.

Answers:It's not a function, it's a relation

Question:Please help with my math problem. Give an example of a set of ordered pairs that has five elements in its domain and four elements in its range.

Answers:(5,4) (3,5) (6.3) (4,3) (1,2) I think that would be the answer because the domain (the x values of the ordered pairs) of this function would be <1,3,4,5,6> which is 5 different numbers while the range (the y values of the ordered pairs) is < 2,3,4,5> four different numbers. I think that's right : )

Question:I have to give my own example of a function using a set of at least four ordered pairs. The domain will be any four integers between 0 and 10. The Range will be any four integers between -12 and 5. THEN I have to give my own example of at least four ordered pairs that DOES NOT model a function. The domain will be any four integers between 0 and 10. The range will be any four integers between -12 and 5. Help?

Answers:First of all, "Domain" means the X values (the values that you can put INTO the function without violating any rules of math) and "Range" means the Y values (the values that can come OUT of the function without violating any rules of math. Now - if it's a function, that means that for every "X" value, there is ONE and only one "Y" value. An example for this problem might be: (1, -2) (2, 0) (4,3) (6, 5) It doesn't have to follow a pattern or a straight line or anything like that. For something that's NOT a function, that means that there is at least one "X" value that has more than one possible "Y" value. So you can pick maybe two ordered pairs that have the same "X," but different "Ys." Example: (1,2) (1,4) (2,3) (5, -3) Notice there are two "Y" values when X=1, so this is not a function.

Question:When a function is represented by a set of ordered pairs, which is the first value placed in the ordered pair? A. domain B. a word C. a number D. range

Answers:domain

From Youtube

Domain and Range - YourTeacher.com - Algebra Help :For a complete lesson on domain and range, go to www.yourteacher.com - 1000+ online math lessons featuring a personal math teacher inside every lesson! In this lesson, students learn that the form (x, y) that is used to represent a point is called an ordered pair, and a relation is a set of ordered pairs, such as {(5, -1), (0, 3), (-3, 4), (3, 4)}. Students also learn that the domain is the set of all x-coordinates, which in this case is {5, 0, -3, 3}, and the range is the set of all y-coordinates, which in this case is {-1, 3, 4}. Finally, students learn to write a rule for a given relation, or find the domain and range when given a rule for the relation.

Finite Simple Group (of Order Two) :Finite Simple Group (of Order Two) The Klein Four Group The path of love is never smooth But mine's continuous for you You're the upper bound in the chains of my heart You're my Axiom of Choice, you know it's true But lately our relation's not so well-defined And I just can't function without you I'll prove my proposition and I'm sure you'll find We're a finite simple group of order two I'm losing my identity I'm getting tensor every day And without loss of generality I will assume that you feel the same way Since every time I see you, you just quotient out The faithful image that I map into But when we're one-to-one you'll see what I'm about 'Cause we're a finite simple group of order two Our equivalence was stable, A principal love bundle sitting deep inside But then you drove a wedge between our two-forms Now everything is so complexified When we first met, we simply connected My heart was open but too dense Our system was already directed To have a finite limit, in some sense I'm living in the kernel of a rank-one map From my domain, its image looks so blue, 'Cause all I see are zeroes, it's a cruel trap But we're a finite simple group of order two I'm not the smoothest operator in my class, But we're a mirror pair, me and you, So let's apply forgetful functors to the past And be a finite simple group, a finite simple group, Let's be a finite simple group of order two (Oughter: "Why not three?") I've proved my proposition now, as you can see, So let's both be ...