Disadvantages of Synthetic Fibers

Synthetic fibers are a result of extensive research by scientists which are improved quality of the fibers naturally occurring in animal and plant fibers. Synthetic fibers are fibers made of chemical processes. Generally synthetic fibers are created by forcing the fiber forming materials through spinnerets into the air which forms a thread. Before the manufacture of synthetic fibers, the fibers were artificially were made from cellulose from plants, these fibers were known as cellulose fibers.

Synthetic fibers are of two kinds. One is the regenerated synthetic fiber which is made from natural materials that have been chemically processed in some way. For example, rayon, it is made by processing the cellulose in wood pulp. The other kind is the true synthetic fiber which is made wholly form chemicals. For example, nylon, which is an original true synthetic fiber made from chemicals that are obtained from crude oil.

Fibers are made by drawing them into long threads or filaments which is known as spinning method, the parent material is melted and dissolved and then forced it into through holes of a perforated plate or spinneret.

Synthetic fibers are made from small molecules of synthesized polymers. The raw material that are used to make these fibers come from petroleum based chemicals or petrochemicals. Different types of chemical compounds produce different types of fibers. There are several different types of synthetic fibers but they have common properties. There are many classes of fiber based on the synthetic polymers which are said to be valuable commercial products like polyester, nylon, polyolefin and acrylic are amongst the most important in the market. The most common method of manufacturing synthetic fibers is the Melt-spinning process.

Disadvantages of Synthetic Fibers are:
  • They do not wet easily.
  • They do not absorb sweat from skin.
  • The mono-fibers do not trap air pockets like cotton and provide poor insulation.
  • In case of fire the synthetic fibers may melt, causing higher burns than the natural fibers. Synthetic fibers do not easily take up dyes as natural fibers.
  • These fibers may burn more readily than natural fibers.
  • They are prone to heat damage and melt easily.
  • They can be damaged by hot washing.
  • There is electrostatic charge generated by rubbing more than with natural fibers.
  • Clothes made of synthetic fibers are uncomfortable to wear.
  • These fibers do not allow your skin to breathe specially the one made of polyester.
  • It has negative health effects because they do not allow skin to breath and may also affect the lymphatic system.

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From Wikipedia

Synthetic fiber

Synthetic fibers are the result of extensive research by scientists to improve upon naturally occurring animal and plantfibers. In general, synthetic fibers are created by forcing, usually through extrusion, fiber forming materials through holes (called spinnerets) into the air, forming a thread. Before synthetic fibers were developed, artificially manufactured fibers were made from cellulose, which comes from plants. These fibers are called cellulose fibers.

Synthetic fibers account for about half of all fiber usage, with applications in every field of fiber and textile technology. Although many classes of fiber based on synthetic polymers have been evaluated as potentially valuable commercial products, four of them - nylon, polyester, acrylic and polyolefin - dominate the market. These four account for approximately 98 per cent by volume of synthetic fiber production, with polyester alone accounting for around 60 per cent.

History

The first artificial fiber, known as artificial silk, became known as viscose around 1894, and finally rayon in 1924. A similar product known as cellulose acetate was discovered in 1865. Rayon and acetate are both artificial fibers, but not truly synthetic, being made from wood. Although these artificial fibers were discovered in the mid-nineteenth century, successful modern manufacture began much later (see the dates below).

Nylon, the first synthetic fiber, made its debut in the United States as a replacement for silk, just in time for World War II rationing. Its novel use as a material for women's stockings overshadowed more practical uses, such as a replacement for the silk in parachutes and other military uses.

Common synthetic fibers include:

Specialty synthetic fibers include:

Other synthetic materials used in fibers include:

Modern fibers that are made from older artificial materials include:

In the horticulture industry synthetics are often used in soils to help the plants grow better. Examples are:

  • expanded polystyrene flakes
  • urea-formaldehyde foam resin
  • polyurethane foam
  • phenolic resin foam

Industry structure

During the last quarter of 20th century, Asian share of global output of synthetic fibers doubled to 65 per cent.


List of synthetic polymers

Syntheticpolymersare often referred to as "plastics", such as the well-known polyethylene and nylon. However, most of them can be classified in at least three main categories: thermoplastics, thermosets and elastomers.

They are not limited to having carbon backbones, elements such as silicon form familiar materials such as silicones. Coordination polymers may contain a range of metals in the backbone, with non-covalent bonding present.

Man-made polymers are used in a wide array of applications: food packaging,paper, films, fibers, tubing, pipes, etc. The personal care industry also uses polymers to aid in texture of products, binding, and moisture retention (e.g. in hairgel and conditioners).

Inorganic examples

Brand names

These polymers are often better known through their brand names, for instance:



From Yahoo Answers

Question:

Answers:Lancenigo di Villorba (TV), Italy You may think to DRESS. Indeed, DRESS MADE BY Synthetic Fibers ARE CHEAPER, WARMER, MORE RESISTANTs AGAINST FIBER-STRESS. You may think to ROPEs. Indeed, ROPEs MADE BY Synthetic Fibers ARE DENSER, MORE RESISTANTs AGAINST TENSILE STRESS AND SOLVENTs. I hope this helps you.

Question:

Answers:stronger

Question:

Answers:known factors in manufacturing for quality and consistency. desirable qualities .eg fire resistant or proof. water resistant/proof. anti stain. anti friction. anti puncture . colour fastness.vapour porosity-sweat gets out water vapour but water droplets do not come in ( barrier ) etc

Question:And how would my 1993 Suzuki Swift handle synthetic oil?

Answers:There are advantages and disadvantages to synthetic. Synthetic oils have less wax in them than petroleum oils, so they will be more liquid/fluid like in cold temperatures. This allows for faster lubrication when starting the engine in very cold temperatures. There have been tests that prove some oils can increase performance and economy, but synthetic oil costs significantly more than petro oils, so you have to decide how you want to spend your money. Many synthetics deteriorate slower than petro oils, although they do not hold any particles/contaminants in suspension any better than petro oils, so that doesn't necessarily mean you can go longer between changes. As for your Suzuki, I would stick with conventional petro oils. Many synthetics have additive/detergent packages different than petro oils and can actually clean out deposits in older engines- deposits that may be plugging an unknown leak. Also, wear over time will cause increased clearances between engine parts and if the synthetic oil gets too thin between clearances, you can have inadequate lubrication in your engine. If I run synthetic in my cars, I start them off around 10-12K miles and haven't had any trouble, I just wouldn't (and don't) use them in an older car such as yours. Hope this helps.

From Youtube

The Diameters of Natural Hairs and Synthetic Fiber. Part 1/2 :The diameters of natural hairs and synthetic fiber are analyzed. We provide SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images of natural hairs: Kolinsky sable, Siberian Squirrel, Hog bristle and the synthetic fiber. We find scales on the surfaces of natural hairs. Synthetic fiber does not have these scales. We provide nice images of the Hog bristle "flags". Hog bristle hair has the largest diameter, then goes Kolinsky hair, and finally, Siberian squirrel which is the softest and has the smallest diameter. The diameter of the synthetic fiber is close to the diameter of Kolinsky hair, however at the tip it drops dramatically. This sometimes leads to the formation of "hooks" at the tips of the synthetic fiber which can ruin the brush. Research by Artist Supply Source, Inc. Visit us at www.ArtistSupplySource.com

The Diameters of Natural Hairs and Synthetic Fiber. Part 2/2 :The diameters of natural hairs and synthetic fiber are analyzed. We provide SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) images of natural hairs: Kolinsky sable, Siberian Squirrel, Hog bristle and the synthetic fiber. We find scales on the surfaces of natural hairs. Synthetic fiber does not have these scales. We provide nice images of the Hog bristle "flags". Hog bristle hair has the largest diameter, then goes Kolinsky hair, and finally, Siberian squirrel which is the softest and has the smallest diameter. The diameter of the synthetic fiber is close to the diameter of Kolinsky hair, however at the tip it drops dramatically. This sometimes leads to the formation of "hooks" at the tips of the synthetic fiber which can ruin the brush. Research by Artist Supply Source, Inc. Visit us at www.ArtistSupplySource.com