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dinitrogen tetroxide n2o4

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Question:Ionic and Covalent Bonding? 1. Determine if the following compounds are likely to have ionic or covalent bonds. a. magnesium oxide, MgO b. Strontium chloride, SrCl2 c. Ozone, O3 d. Methanol, Ch4 O 2. Identify which 2 of the following substances will conduct electricity, and explain why. a. aluminum foil b. sugar, C12H22O11, dissolved in water. c. potassium hydroxide , KOH, dissolved in water 3. Draw the structural formula fir acetylene. Atoms bond in the order HCCH. Carbon and hydrogen atoms share 2 electrons, and each carbon atoms must have a total of four bonds. How many electrons do the carbon atoms share? 4. Predict whether a silver coin can conduct electricity. What kind of bonds does silver have? 5. Describe how it is possible for calcium hydroxide, Ca(Oh)2, to have both ionic and covalent bonds. 6. Explain why electrons are shared equally in ozone, O3, and unequally in carbon dioxide, Co2. 7. Analyze whether dinitrogen tetroxide, N2O4, has covalent or ionic bonds. Describe how you reached this conclusion. 8. Bond energy measure the energy per mole of a substance needed to break a bond. Which element has the greater bond energy, oxygen or nitrogen? (Hint: Which element has more bonds?) Answer as much as you can please.

Answers:1. Determine if the following compounds are likely to have ionic or covalent bonds. a. magnesium oxide, MgO ionic (metal and nonmetal) b. Strontium chloride, SrCl2 ionic (metal and nonmetal) c. Ozone, O3 covalent d. Methanol, CH4O covalent (C and O are nonmetals and H is a metal) *a metal bonded with a nonmetal forms an ionic bond; also, when an element is bonded to itself it forms a covalent bond 2. Identify which 2 of the following substances will conduct electricity, and explain why. a. aluminum foil because Aluminum is a metal and metals are highly conductive & c. potassium hydroxide, KOH, dissolved in water because potassium hydroxide dissolved in water dissociates and forms potassium and hydroxide ions; ions conduct electricity *It CAN'T be b. because sugar does not break up into ions that conduct electricity. 3. How many electrons do the carbon atoms share? Each carbon atom has 4 valence electrons, so each C atom can form 4 bonds. In HCCH, each carbon atom shares 4 electrons and sincethere are 2 of them, there are 8 electrons being shared. 4. Predict whether a silver coin can conduct electricity. What kind of bonds does silver have? The bonds between atoms are metallic which means that the outer electrons are held by weak bonds which can easily dissociate. Dissociation of ions causes electrical conductivity. 5. Describe how it is possible for calcium hydroxide, Ca(OH)2, to have both ionic and covalent bonds. Ca and O can share electrons (covalent bond) with each other or H can take electrons away (ionic bond) from Ca. 6. Explain why electrons are shared equally in ozone, O3, and unequally in carbon dioxide, CO2. In CO2, O is more electronegative meaning that it seeks to pull the electron between itself and carbon more strongly which results in unequal sharing of electrons. In O3, when atoms are bonded together, the electrons are shared equally. 7. Analyze whether dinitrogen tetroxide, N2O4, has covalent or ionic bonds. Describe how you reached this conclusion. N2O4 has covalent bonds because N and O are both nonmetals; nonmetals form covalent bonds. 8. Which element has the greater bond energy, oxygen or nitrogen? (Hint: Which element has more bonds?) Oxygen can form 6 bonds, but Nitrogen can only form 5 bonds, so Oxygen has a greater bond energy.

Question:N2O3, N2O4, N2O Sf6, Sf2 PCl5, PCl3 Thanks in advance. I'll choose a best answer.

Answers:N2O3 is usually called Dinitrogen trioxide ( IUPAC name is Nitrogen (III) Oxide) N2O4 usually called Dinitrogen Tetroxide (IUPAC name Nitrogen (IV) Oxide and it is actually 2 NO2 molecules joined together) N2O usually called Nitrous Oxide or Laughing gas or entenox ( IUPAC name Nitrogen (I) Oxide.) SF6 is Sulphur Hexafluoride (IUPAC Sulphur (VI) Fluoride) SF2 is Sulphur Difluoride (IUPAC Sulphur (II) Fluoride) PCl5 is Phosphorus Pentachloride (IUPAC Phosphorus (V) Chloride) PCl3 is Phosphorus Trichloride (IUPAC Phosphorus (III) Chloride) The common names are still widely used even though the proper IUPAC names should have been used for nearly 50 years. Old profs pass on the old names to students who pass them on again when they become profs and so on .This is much more the case in the US than in Europe.

Question:I need to know about the shape of this molecule.Actually, I know for a fact that it has a bent shaped molecule, but the thing I cant seem to get through my head is how is it possible with just one electron in the outer shell? Please explain in detail.Thankyou. Also if anyone could tell me a site from where I can get practice questions on Ideal Gas Equation?

Answers:With the nitrogen atom in the middle, the oxygen atoms are offset with a lesser angle (O-N-O) of 134.3 degrees. It is straight if in the anion form, nitrite, and has a lesser angle of 115 degrees in the cation form, nitronium. In neutral form, it does have one unpaired electron and is paramagnetic. The reason for this occurring is that 2 moles are in equilibrium with dinitrogen tetroxide, N2O4, which has paired electrons. For practice questions on Ideal Gas Law, visit http://www.ausetute.com.au/idealgas.html and http://science.widener.edu/svb/tutorial/startidealgas.html

Question:help for work plz

Answers:dispersion forces; ionic bonding; NaCl. hydrogen bonding dispersion forces; NH3. metallic bonding; dispersion forces; Fe. Explaination Three types of force can operate between covalent molecules: Dispersion Forces also known as London Forces (named after Fritz London who first described these forces theoretically 1930) or as Weak Intermolecular Forces or as van der Waal's Forces (namd after the person who contributed to our understanding of non-ideal gas behaviour). Dipole-dipole interactions Hydrogen bonds Relative strength of Intermolecular Forces: Intermolecular forces (dispersion forces, dipole-dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds) are much weaker than intramolecular forces (covalent bonds, ionic bonds or metallic bonds) dispersion forces are the weakest intermolecular force (one hundredth-one thousandth the strength of a covalent bond), hydrogen bonds are the strongest intermolecular force (about one-tenth the strength of a covalent bond). dispersion forces < dipole-dipole interactions < hydrogen bonds Dispersion Forces (London Forces, Weak Intermolecular Forces, van der Waal's Forces) are very weak forces of attraction between molecules resulting from: momentary dipoles occurring due to uneven electron distributions in neighbouring molecules as they approach one another the weak residual attraction of the nuclei in one molecule for the electrons in a neighbouring molecule. The more electrons that are present in the molecule, the stronger the dispersion forces will be. Dispersion forces are the only type of intermolecular force operating between non-polar molecules, for example, dispersion forces operate between hydrogen (H2) molecules, chlorine (Cl2) molecules, carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules, dinitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) molecules and methane (CH4) molecules.

From Youtube

Dynamic Equilibrium between Nitrogen Dioxide and Dinitrogen Tetroxide :The reversible reaction between NO2 and N2O4 is exothermic on forming N2O4 and endothermic on forming NO2. LeChatelier prediicts that heating the mixture will favour the formation of NO2. (Adding energy assists the endothermic reaction and inhibits the exothermic reaction, changing the rates of the forward and backward reactions. Increasing the rate of one reaction more than the other changing the composition of the equilibrium mixture.

Formation of Dinitrogen Trioxide (N2O3) :A glass container of nitrogen dioxide is chilled with a mixture of dry ice and ethanol to form a product of equilibrium- dinitrogen trioxide, a greenish-blue, bluish-green liquid (chemical formula N2O3) Safe glass handling techniques must be used to prevent stress cracks or implosions during this experiment. Eye protection is a minimum requirement Initially, at STP, nitrogen dioxide is the prevalent specie in the bottle. As the bottle is chilled, the drop in temperature forces the equilibrium to shift from NO2 into its dimer, dinitrogen tetroxide. This gas further condenses at an even lower temperature to form a green-blue liquid, dinitrogen trioxide. By now, the pressure in the flask is less than half of what it is at one atmosphere. When the bottle is removed from its bath, the N2O3 is seen boiling, restoring the equilibrium found at STP.