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From Wikipedia

Independent clause

An independent clause (or main clause) is a clause that can stand by itself, also known as a simple sentence. An independent clause contains asubject and a predicate; it makes sense by itself.

Multiple independent clauses can be joined by using a semicolon or a comma plus a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so).

Examples

  • I love penguins. (simple sentence)
  • I drive a bus. (simple sentence)
  • I am a doctor, and my wife is a lawyer. (compound sentence made up of two independent clauses: I am a doctor and my wife is a lawyer)
  • I want to be a nurse, but I need to receive my science degree. (compound sentence made up of two independent clauses:

(I want to be a nurse)
(I need to receive my science degree)

  • Go to the store, and get me a carton of milk. (compound sentence) (Though a subject is not visible, in English the subject of an imperative is considered to be the pronoun 'you')


From Yahoo Answers

Question:What is the dependent clause(s) and indicate whether it functions as an adjective or an adverb. 1- Although Mr. Moody did not become a rich shoe salesman, he became the greatest evangelist of the late 1800s. 2- Anyone who will give himself wholly to God can be blessed like Mr. Moody. 3- Since God delights in using ordinary people, He can use you. 4- However, god cannot use that which is not wholly His. 5-Let the life that Mr. Moody lived challenge you to a total commitment. ---------------------- Please help me? :D Oh, by the way, Mr. Moody was an idiot. And I hate my super christian school. That is all. Thank you.

Answers:1.he became the greatest evangelist of the late 1800s-adjective 2.like Mr. Moody-adverb 3.Since God delights in using ordinary people-adverb 4.However-neither 5.to a total commitment-adj

Question:a. The man who came here yesterday was selling magazines b. What he said bothered the group. c. I can't go because I have so much to do. They are going to be adverb, adjective, noun, or preposition.

Answers:a. The man who came here yesterday was selling magazines "who came here yesterday " --- adjective clause b. What he said bothered the group. "What he said" -- noun clause c. I can't go because I have so much to do. "because I have so much to do" -- adverbial clause

Question:However, is this formula more flexible than this. For example, can you have this formula, instead: Independent Clause; Conjunctive Adverb, Dependent Clause, Independent Clause. For example, The dog was sleeping; however, although it was tired, he was sleeping restlessly. I was just wondering if the conjunctive adverb, used with a semi colon before and a comma after, could be followed by first a dependent clause and then the independent clause. Answers would be much appreciated. Thanks.

Answers:It's fine without the "however", but basically redundant with it. The dog was sleeping; although it was tired, he was sleeping restlessly. The dog was sleeping; it was tired, he was sleeping restlessly, however. As far as the semicolon goes, it's technically being used correctly, separating related independent clauses, but it really isn't necessary. Two sentences would work just as well.

Question:According to my grammar book, a clause is "a group of related words that includes a subject and a predicate." They give the following example of an adverb clause (the clause is CAPITALIZED: "Exhausted AFTER THE MATCH WAS OVER, Kim decided to take a long nap." Okay, how is this a clause? What are the subject and predicate of this clause?

Answers:It is an adverbial clause that answers the question "WHEN" Exhausted Kim decided (when)after the match was over -to take a long nap. Adverbs tell when, where, how. (After-coordinating conjunction) the-adj. Match-subject/ was-verb over-adverb

From Youtube

Dependent Adverb Clauses :Dependent Adverb Clauses

Dependent and Independent Clauses :The difference between dependent and independent clauses and how to watch for fragments.