application of colloids in daily life

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From Wikipedia

Total dissolved solids

Total Dissolved Solids (often abbreviated TDS) is a measure of the combined content of all inorganic and organic substances contained in a liquid in: molecular, ionized or micro-granular (colloidal sol) suspended form. Generally the operational definition is that the solids must be small enough to survive filtration through a sieve the size of two micrometer. Total dissolved solids are normally discussed only for freshwater systems, as salinity comprises some of the ions constituting the definition of TDS. The principal application of TDS is in the study of water quality for streams, rivers and lakes, although TDS is not generally considered a primary pollutant (e.g. it is not deemed to be associated with health effects) it is used as an indication of aesthetic characteristics of drinking water and as an aggregate indicator of the presence of a broad array of chemical contaminants.

Primary sources for TDS in receiving waters are agricultural and residential runoff, leaching of soil contamination and point sourcewater pollution discharge from industrial or sewage treatment plants. The most common chemical constituents are calcium, phosphates, nitrates, sodium, potassium and chloride, which are found in nutrient runoff, general stormwater runoff and runoff from snowy climates where road de-icing salts are applied. The chemicals may be cations, anions, molecules or agglomerations on the order of one thousand or fewer molecules, so long as a soluble micro-granule is formed. More exotic and harmful elements of TDS are pesticides arising from surface runoff. Certain naturally occurring total dissolved solids arise from the weathering and dissolution of rocks and soils. The United States has established a secondary water quality standard of 500 mg/l to provide for palatability of drinking water.

Total dissolved solids are differentiated from total suspended solids (TSS), in that the latter cannot pass through a sieve of two micrometers and yet are indefinitely suspended in solution. The term "settleable solids" refers to material of any size that will not remain suspended or dissolved in a holding tank not subject to motion, and excludes both TDS and TSS. Settleable solids may include larger particulate matter or insoluble molecules.

Measurement of TDS

The two principal methods of measuring total dissolved solids are gravimetry and conductivity. Gravimetric methods are the most accurate and involve evaporating the liquid solvent to leave a residue that can subsequently be weighed with a precision analytical balance (normally capable of .0001 gram accuracy). This method is generally the best, although it is time-consuming and leads to inaccuracies if a high proportion of the TDS consists of low boiling point organic chemicals, which will evaporate along with the water. If inorganic salts comprise the great majority of TDS, gravimetric methods are appropriate.

Electrical conductivity of water is directly related to the concentration of dissolved ionized solids in the water. Ions from the dissolved solids in water create the ability for that water to conduct an electrical current, which can be measured using a conventional conductivity meter or TDS meter. When correlated with laboratory TDS measurements, conductivity provides an approximate value for the TDS concentration, usually to within ten-percent accuracy.

Hydrological simulation

Hydrologic transport models are used to mathematically analyze movement of TDS within river systems. The most common models address surface runoff, allowing variation in land use type, topography, soil type, vegetative cover, precipitation, and land management practice (e.g. the application rate of a fertilizer). Runoff models have evolved to a good degree of accuracy and permit the evaluation of alternative land management practices upon impacts to stream water quality.

Basin models are used to more comprehensively evaluate total dissolved solids within a catchment basin and dynamically along various stream reaches. The DSSAM model was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This hydrology transport model is actually based upon the pollutant-loading metric called "Total Maximum Daily Load" (TMDL), which ad

Horizontal plane

In geometry, physics, astronomy, geography, and related sciences and contexts, a planeis said to be horizontal at a given point if it is locally perpendicular to thegradient of the gravityfield, i.e., with the direction of the gravitational force (per unit mass) at that point.

In radio science, horizontal plane is used to plot an antenna's relative field strength in relation to the ground (which directly affects a station's coverage area) on a polar graph. Normally the maximum of 1.000 or 0 dB is at the top, which is labeled 0o, running clockwise back around to the top at 360°. Other field strengths are expressed as a decimal less than 1.000, a percentage less than 100%, or decibels less than 0 dB. If the graph is of an actual or proposed installation, rotation is applied so that the top is 0otrue north. See also the perpendicular vertical plane.

In general, something that is horizontal can be drawn from left to right (or right to left), such as the x-axis in the Cartesian coordinate system.

Discussion

Although the word horizontal is common in daily life and language (see below), it is subject to many misconceptions. The precise definition above and the following discussion points will hopefully clarify these issues.

  • The concept of horizontality only makes sense in the context of a clearly measurable gravity field, i.e., in the 'neighborhood' of a planet, star, etc. When the gravity field becomes very weak (the masses are too small or too distant from the point of interest), the notion of being horizontal loses its meaning.
  • In the presence of a simple, time-invariant, rotationally symmetric gravity field, a plane is horizontal only at the reference point. The horizontal planes with respect to two separate points are not parallel, they intersect.
  • In general, a horizontal plane will only be perpendicular to a vertical direction if both are specifically defined with respect to the same point: a direction is only vertical at the point of reference. Thus both horizontality and verticality are strictly speaking local concepts, and it is always necessary to state to which location the direction or the plane refers to. Note that (1) the same restriction applies to the straight lines contained within the plane: they are horizontal only at the point of reference, and (2) those straight lines contained in the plane but not passing by the reference point are not horizontal anywhere.
  • In reality, the gravity field of a heterogeneous planet such as Earth is deformed due to the inhomogeneous spatial distribution of materials with different densities. Actual horizontal planes are thus not even parallel even if their reference points are along the same vertical direction.
  • At any given location, the total gravitational force is a function of time, because the objects that generate the reference gravity field move relative to each other. For instance, on Earth, the local horizontal plane at a given point (as materialized by a pair of spirit levels) changes with the relative position of the Moon (air, sea and land tides).
  • Furthermore, on a rotating planet such as Earth, there is a difference between the strictly gravitational pull of the planet (and possibly other celestial objects such as the Moon, the Sun, etc.), and the apparent net force applied (e.g., on a free-falling object) that can be measured in the laboratory or in the field. This difference is due to the centrifugal force associated with the planet's rotation. This is a fictitious force: it only arises when calculations or experiments are conducted in non-inertial frames of reference.

Practical use in daily life

The concept of a horizontal plane is thus anything but simple, although, in practice, most of these effects and variations are rather small: they are measurable and can be predicted with great accuracy, but they may not greatly affect our daily life.

This dichotomy between the apparent simplicity of a concept and an actual complexity of defining (and measuring) it in scientific terms arises from the fact that the typical linear scales and dimensions of relevance in daily life are 3 orders of magnitude (or more) smaller than the size of the Earth. Hence, the world appears to be flat locally, and horizontal planes in nearby locations appear to be parallel. Such statements are nevertheless approximations; whether they are acceptable in any particular context or application depends on the applicable requirements, in particular in terms of accuracy.

In graphical contexts, such as drawing and drafting on rectangular paper, it is very common to associate one of the dimensions of the paper with a horizontal, even though the entire sheet of paper is standing on a flat horizontal (or slanted) table. In this case, the horizontal direction is typically from the left side of the paper to the right side. This is purely conventional (although it is somehow 'natural' when drawing a natural scene as it is seen in reality), and may lead to misunderstandings or misconceptions, especially in an educational context.



From Yahoo Answers

Question:me in class 10th and need to make a model on the application of 3d geometry in daily life...........please help....please..suggest some sites

Answers:3D geometry explains different object with three-dimensional shapes, that cannot be sketched on papers. Spheres, Cones are the example of 3D. A ball is used in daily life. Motor car tyres are cylindrical and are also in daily use. You look at your TV which is a 3D object of daily use. A die is in the shape of a cube. A portable DVD player is in the shape of a rectangular prism.

Question:TESTS: a. putting NaOH solution and nitric acid-PROTEINS b. putting iodine solution-STARCH c. rubbing fats on a paper-FATS

Answers:(A) Police forensics units use this one to 'develop' fingerprints in certain circumstances. (B) Outside of a general biology lab, I cannot imagine any practical use in daily life. A sort of reverse version has been used as a medical test for sweating. An iodine solution is applied to the skin and allowed to dry, then dusted with starch. Since the reaction requires water, the treated skin will turn purple-black if/when sweating occurs. (C) The pioneers and other non-technology peoples used to make translucent window coverings by rubbing fats into thin animal skins. This allowed them to keep out the cold winds while letting in some daylight. I suppose there might be some similar application for paper, but I can't think of one (aside from maybe using it as a fire starter; fat-soaked paper would burn pretty easily).

Question:i'm making my term paper..and i badly need ur ans. thanks!

Answers:Clinical? Not sure about clinical....but in day to day life for sure.....eg Mining, to dissolves rock around gold, Vinegar, Bleaches, Agents such as bathroom mold removing products, Citric Acids used in cooking...the list is abundant!

Question:All those algebraic equations, are they relevant when our daily life is concerned?

Answers:It does teach you another way of looking at things. For example, if I wanted to make something which calls for 2 cups of sugar, and I only have 1 1/2 cups, how can I adjust the rest of the ingredients to I can still make the cookies? I don't have to use algebra for that--but can if I want.

From Youtube

Acid water applications :have a lots of application in the daily life.

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