advantages and disadvantages of synthetic polymers

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From Wikipedia

Pesticide

A pesticide is any substance or mixture of substances intended for preventing, destroying, repelling or mitigating any pest. A pesticide may be a chemical substance, biological agent (such as a virus or bacterium), antimicrobial, disinfectant or device used against any pest. Pests include insects, plant pathogens, weeds, molluscs, birds, mammals, fish, nematodes (roundworms), and microbes that destroy property, spread disease or are a vector for disease or cause a nuisance. Although there are benefits to the use of pesticides, there are also drawbacks, such as potential toxicity to humans and other animals. According to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, 10 of the 12 most dangerous and persistent organic chemicals are pesticides.

Definition

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has defined the term of pesticide as:

any substance or mixture of substances intended for preventing, destroying or controlling any pest, including vectors of human or animal disease, unwanted species of plants or animals causing harm during or otherwise interfering with the production, processing, storage, transport or marketing of food, agricultural commodities, wood and wood products or animal feedstuffs, or substances which may be administered to animals for the control of insects, arachnids or other pests in or on their bodies. The term includes substances intended for use as a plant growth regulator, defoliant, desiccant or agent for thinning fruit or preventing the premature fall of fruit. Also used as substances applied to crops either before or after harvest to protect the commodity from deterioration during storage and transport.

Classification

Subclasses of pesticides include: herbicides, insecticides, fungicides, rodenticides, pediculocides, and biocides.

Pesticides can be classified by target organism, chemical structure, and physical state. Pesticides can also be classed as inorganic, synthetic, or biologicals (biopesticides), although the distinction can sometimes blur. Biopesticides include microbial pesticides and biochemical pesticides. Plant-derived pesticides, or "botanicals", have been developing quickly. These include the pyrethroids, rotenoids, nicotinoids, and a fourth group that includes strychnine and scilliroside.

Many pesticides can be grouped into chemical families. Prominent insecticide families include organochlorines, organophosphates, and carbamates. Organochlorine hydrocarbons (e.g. DDT) could be separated into dichlorodiphenylethanes, cyclodiene compounds, and other related compounds. They operate by disrupting the sodium/potassium balance of the nerve fiber, forcing the nerve to transmit continuously. Their toxicities vary greatly, but they have been phased out because of their persistence and potential to bioaccumulate. Organophosphate and carbamates largely replaced organochlorines. Both operate through inhibiting the enzyme acetylcholinesterase, allowing acetylcholine to transfer nerve impulses indefinitely and causing a variety of symptoms such as weakness or paralysis. Organophosphates are quite toxic to vertebrates, and have in some cases been replaced by less toxic carbamates. Thiocarbamate and dithiocarbamates are subclasses of carbamates. Prominent families of herbicides include pheoxy and benzoic acid herbicides (e.g. 2,4-D), triazines (e.g. atrazine), ureas (e.g. diuron), and Chloroacetanilides (e.g. alachlor). Phenoxy compounds tend to selectively kill broadleaved weeds rather than grasses. The phenoxy and benzoic acid herbicides function similar to plant growth hormones, and grow cells without normal cell division, crushing the plants nutrient transport system. Triazines interfere with photsynthesis. Many commonly used pesticides are not included in these families, including glyphosate.

  • Algicides or algaecides for the control of algae
  • Avicides for the control of birds
  • Bactericides for the control of bacteria
  • Fungicides for the control of fungi and oomycetes
  • Herbicides (e.g. glyphosate) for the control of weeds
  • Insecticides (e.g. organochlorines, mixture in a liquid or semi-liquid state that adheres or bonds items together. Adhesives may come from either natural or synthetic sources. The types of materials that can be bonded are vast but they are especially useful for bonding thin materials. Adhesives cure (harden) by either evaporating a solvent or by chemical reactions that occur between two or more constituents.

    Adhesives are advantageous for joining thin or dissimilar materials, minimizing weight, and when a vibration dampening joint is needed. A disadvantage to adhesives is that they do not form an instantaneous joint, unlike most other joining processes, because the adhesive needs time to cure.

    The earliest known date for a simple glue is 200,000 BC and for a compound glue 70,000 BC.

    History

    The oldest known adhesive, dated to approximately 200,000 BC, is from spear stone flakes glued to a wood with birch-bark-tar, which was found in central Italy. The use of compound glues to haft stone spears into wood dates back to round 70,000 BC. Evidence for this has been found in Sibudu Cave, South Africa and the compound glues used were made from plant gum and red ochre. The Tyrolean Iceman had weapons fixed together with the aid of birch-bark-tar glue.

    6000-year-old ceramics show evidence of adhesives based upon animal glues made by rendering animal products such as horse teeth. During the times of Babylonia, tar-like glue was used for gluing statues. The Egyptians made much use of animal glues to adhere furniture, ivory, and papyrus. The Mongols also used adhesives to make their short bows, and the Native Americans of the eastern United States used a mixture of spruce gum and fat as adhesives to fashion waterproof seams in their birchbarkcanoes.

    In medieval Europe, egg whites were used as glue to decorate parchments with gold leaf. The first actual glue factory was founded in Holland in the early 18th century. In the 1750s, the English introduced fish glue. As the modern world evolved, several other patented materials, such as bones, starch, fish skins and isinglass, and casein, were introduced as alternative materials for glue manufacture. Modern glues have improved flexibility, toughness, curing rate, and chemical resistance.

    In the late 19th century in Switzerland, casein was first used as a wood glue. Today, it is seen to be used to glue grocery bags.

    Types

    Adhesives are typically organized by the method of adhesion. These are then organized into reactive and non-reactive adhesives, which refers to if the adhesive chemically reacts to harden. Alternatively they can be organized by whether the raw stock is of natural, or synthetic origin, or by their starting physical phase.

    Non-reactive adhesives

    Drying adhesives

    There are two types of adhesives that harden by drying: solvent based adhesives and polymer dispersion adhesives, also known as emulsion adhesives.

    Solvent based adhesives are a mixture of ingredients (typically polymers) dissolved in a solvent. White glue, contact adhesives and rubber cements are members of the drying adhesive family. As the solvent evaporates, the adhesive hardens. Depending on the chemical composition of the adhesive, they will adhere to different materials to greater or lesser degrees.

    Polymer dispersion adhesives are milky-white dispersions often based on polyvinyl acetate (PVAc). Used extensively in the woodworking and packaging industries. Also used with fabrics and fabric-based components, and in engineered products such as loudspeaker cones.

    Pressure sensitive adhesives

    Pressure sensitive adhesives (PSA) form a bond by the application of light pressure to marry the adhesive with the adherend. They are designed with a balance between flow and resistance to flow. The bond forms because the adhesive is soft enough to flow (i.e. "wet") the adherend. The bond has strength because the adhesive is hard enough to resist flow when stress is applied to the bond. Once the adhesive and the adherend are in close proximity, molecular interactions, such as van der Waals forces, become involved in the bond, contributing significantly to its ultimate strength.

    PSAs are designed for either permanent or removable applications. Examples of permanent applications include safety labels for power equipment, foil tape for HVAC duct work, automotive interior trim assembly, and sound/vibration damping films. Some high performance permanent PSAs exhibit high adhesion values and can support kilograms of weight per square centimeter of contact area, even at elevated temperature. Permanent PSAs may be initially removable (for example to recover mislabeled goods) and build adhesion to a permanent bond after several hours or days.

    Removable adhesives are designed to form a temporary bond, and ideally can be removed after months or years without leaving residue on the adherend. Removable adhesives are used in applications such as surface protection films, masking tapes, bookmark and note papers, price marking labels, promotional graphics materials, and for skin contact (wound care dressings, EKG electrodes, athletic tape, analgesic and transdermal drug patches, etc.). Some removable adhesives are designed to repeatedly stick and unstick. They have low adhesion and generally can not support much weight.

    Pressure sensitive adhesives are manufactured with either a liquid carrier or in 100% solid form. Articles are made from liquid PSAs by coat


From Yahoo Answers

Question:And how would my 1993 Suzuki Swift handle synthetic oil?

Answers:There are advantages and disadvantages to synthetic. Synthetic oils have less wax in them than petroleum oils, so they will be more liquid/fluid like in cold temperatures. This allows for faster lubrication when starting the engine in very cold temperatures. There have been tests that prove some oils can increase performance and economy, but synthetic oil costs significantly more than petro oils, so you have to decide how you want to spend your money. Many synthetics deteriorate slower than petro oils, although they do not hold any particles/contaminants in suspension any better than petro oils, so that doesn't necessarily mean you can go longer between changes. As for your Suzuki, I would stick with conventional petro oils. Many synthetics have additive/detergent packages different than petro oils and can actually clean out deposits in older engines- deposits that may be plugging an unknown leak. Also, wear over time will cause increased clearances between engine parts and if the synthetic oil gets too thin between clearances, you can have inadequate lubrication in your engine. If I run synthetic in my cars, I start them off around 10-12K miles and haven't had any trouble, I just wouldn't (and don't) use them in an older car such as yours. Hope this helps.

Question:Artificial Blood (advantage & disadvantage) is the topic for my chemistry report. The teacher told me to focus on the chemistry part of it, not the biology part of it. But I don't know how. Can anyone give me some suggestions. I really appreciate it.

Answers:Artificial blood is a product made to act as a substitute for red blood cells. While true blood serves many different functions, artificial blood is designed for the sole purpose of transporting oxygen and carbon dioxide throughout the body. Depending on the type of artificial blood, it can be produced in different ways using synthetic production, chemical isolation, or recombinant biochemical technology. Development of the first blood substitutes dates back to the early 1600s, and the search for the ideal blood substitute continues. check this out.. it will giv u all de answers.. http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Artificial-Blood.html jj

Question:i need to list what the advantages and disadvantages are of using synthetic detergents, which i have done, and of soap. there is something to do with effects on skin, environmental problems that needs to be considered but im stuck. any help greatly apprieciated

Answers:some like soap because they have sensitivities to detergents then there is the "natural" thing detergents have the advantage of rinsing cleaner (soap forms soap scum in hard water) from skin and hair, being possible to formulate with a neutral pH which would make it more gentle on the eyes and easier on the hair (the high pH of soap makes the cuticle on hair strands roughen - leaving some people's hair rough and dry)

Question:

Answers:The advantages to petroleum based are that they are stronger, less brittle, cheaper to make, and easily recyclable. Some disadvantages are that they produce More waste than synthetic plastics, are non-biodegradable, and use a very large portion of the crude oil supply to produce. I hope this was very helpful for you.

From Youtube

Cold Steel Bokken Update :Cold Steel Bokken Hundreds of years ago, the Japanese discovered a simple truth; that to become a good swordsman you'll have to practice, a great deal. To become a great swordsman you'll have to practice with a "live blade". And during the period between "good" and "great", you should spend your time building your skills and confidence enough to wield a razor sharp Katana safely and effectively. To accomplish this, the Japanese relied on a simple wooden sword called a "bokken" for much of their training. It was made from the super tough wood of the Japanese White Oak, a wood they called Kashi. The swords produced from this wood had the advantage of replicating the size, weight and feel of a steel sword, while minimizing the possibility of causing grievous or permanent injury to those who used it. Authentic Kashi wood Bokkens are still used today, but are becoming quite costly. They also have the disadvantages, being made of wood, that they may rot, crack split or splinter. Cold Steel's solution to these dilemmas was to design a synthetic substitute, low in price and impervious to the elements. Our Bokken and our new Wakazashi Bokken are made of the heaviest grade polypropylene available and closely duplicate a real Katana and Wakazashi in length, size, weight and feel. While they're not quite as rigid as wood, they have the advantages of being virtually unbreakable and remarkably stiff and cut resistant. Bokken Specifications: Weight: 17.7 oz Thick: 1" Length: 30" Handle ...