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From Wikipedia

Physical change

Physical change is a concept introduced to contrast with the concept of chemical change. A physical change is any change not involving a change in the substance's chemical identity. Matter undergoes chemical change when the composition of the substances changes: one or more substances combine or break up (as in a relationship) to form new substances. Physical changes occur when objects undergo a change that does not change their chemical nature. A physical change involves a change in physical properties. Physical properties can be observed without changing the composition of matter. Examples of physical properties include: texture, shape, size, color, volume, mass, weight, and density.

An example of a physical change occurs when making a baseball bat. Wood is carefully crafted into a shape which will allow a batter to best apply force on the ball. Even though the wood has changed shape and therefore physical properties, the chemical nature of the wood has not been altered. The bat and the original piece of wood are still the same chemical substance.

Changes are sometimes hard to categorize strictly as physical or as chemical. Dissolving a salt in water involves the breaking of chemical bonds, yet is often described as a physical change. Some teachers hold that a chemical change is a rearrangement of atoms, but many physical changes also involve the rearrangement of atoms. Many chemical changes are irreversible, and many physical changes are reversible, but reversibility is not a certain criterion for classification. Although chemical changes are often recognized by an indication such as odor, color change, production of a precipitate, or production of a gas, every one of these indicators can result from physical change.



From Encyclopedia

physics

physics branch of science traditionally defined as the study of matter , energy , and the relation between them; it was called natural philosophy until the late 19th cent. and is still known by this name at a few universities. Physics is in some senses the oldest and most basic pure science; its discoveries find applications throughout the natural sciences, since matter and energy are the basic constituents of the natural world. The other sciences are generally more limited in their scope and may be considered branches that have split off from physics to become sciences in their own right. Physics today may be divided loosely into classical physics and modern physics. Classical Physics Classical physics includes the traditional branches and topics that were recognized and fairly well developed before the beginning of the 20th cent.— mechanics , sound , light , heat , and electricity and magnetism . Mechanics is concerned with bodies acted on by forces and bodies in motion and may be divided into statics (study of the forces on a body or bodies at rest), kinematics (study of motion without regard to its causes), and dynamics (study of motion and the forces that affect it); mechanics may also be divided into solid mechanics and fluid mechanics, the latter including such branches as hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, aerodynamics, and pneumatics. Acoustics , the study of sound, is often considered a branch of mechanics because sound is due to the motions of the particles of air or other medium through which sound waves can travel and thus can be explained in terms of the laws of mechanics. Among the important modern branches of acoustics is ultrasonics , the study of sound waves of very high frequency, beyond the range of human hearing. Optics, the study of light, is concerned not only with visible light but also with infrared and ultraviolet radiation, which exhibit all of the phenomena of visible light except visibility, e.g., reflection , refraction , interference , diffraction , dispersion (see spectrum ), and polarization of light . Heat is a form of energy, the internal energy possessed by the particles of which a substance is composed; thermodynamics deals with the relationships between heat and other forms of energy. Electricity and magnetism have been studied as a single branch of physics since the intimate connection between them was discovered in the early 19th cent.; an electric current gives rise to a magnetic field and a changing magnetic field induces an electric current. Electrostatics deals with electric charges at rest, electrodynamics with moving charges, and magnetostatics with magnetic poles at rest. Modern Physics Most of classical physics is concerned with matter and energy on the normal scale of observation; by contrast, much of modern physics is concerned with the behavior of matter and energy under extreme conditions or on the very large or very small scale. For example, atomic and nuclear physics studies matter on the smallest scale at which chemical elements can be identified. The physics of elementary particles is on an even smaller scale, being concerned with the most basic units of matter; this branch of physics is also known as high-energy physics because of the extremely high energies necessary to produce many types of particles in large particle accelerators . On this scale, ordinary, commonsense notions of space, time, matter, and energy are no longer valid. The two chief theories of modern physics present a different picture of the concepts of space, time, and matter from that presented by classical physics. The quantum theory is concerned with the discrete, rather than continuous, nature of many phenomena at the atomic and subatomic level, and with the complementary aspects of particles and waves in the description of such phenomena. The theory of relativity is concerned with the description of phenomena that take place in a frame of reference that is in motion with respect to an observer; the special theory of relativity is concerned with relative uniform motion in a straight line and the general theory of relativity with accelerated motion and its connection with gravitation. Both the quantum theory and the theory of relativity find applications in all areas of modern physics. Evolution of Physics Greek Contributions The earliest history of physics is interrelated with that of the other sciences. A number of contributions were made during the period of Greek civilization, dating from Thales and the early Ionian natural philosophers in the Greek colonies of Asia Minor (6th and 5th cent. BC). Democritus (c.460-370 BC) proposed an atomic theory of matter and extended it to other phenomena as well, but the dominant theories of matter held that it was formed of a few basic elements, usually earth, air, fire, and water. In the school founded by Pythagoras of Samos the principal concept was that of number; it was applied to all aspects of the universe, from planetary orbits to the lengths of strings used to sound musical notes. The most important philosophy of the Greek period was produced by two men at Athens, Plato (427-347 BC) and his student Aristotle (384-322 BC); Aristotle in particular had a critical influence on the development of science in general and physics in particular. The Greek approach to physics was largely geometrical and reached its peak with Archimedes (287-212 BC), who studied a wide range of problems and anticipated the methods of the calculus. Another important scientist of the early Hellenistic period, centered in Alexandria, Egypt, was the astronomer Aristarchus (c.310-220 BC), who proposed a heliocentric, or sun-centered, system of the universe. However, just as the earlier atomic theory had not become generally accepted, so too the astronomical system that eventually prevailed was the geocentric system proposed by Hipparchus (190-120 BC) and developed in detail by Ptolemy (AD 85-AD 165). Preservation of Learning With the passing of the Greek civilization and the Roman civilization that followed it, Greek learning passed into the hands of the Muslim world that spread its influence from the E Mediterranean eastward into Asia, where it picked up contributions from the Chinese (papermaking, gunpowder) and the Hindus (the place-value decimal number system with a zero), and westward as far as Spain, where Islamic culture flourished in Córdoba, Toledo, and other cities. Little specific advance was made in physics during this period, but the preservation and study of Greek science by the Muslim world made possible the revival of learning in the West beginning in the 12th and 13th cent. The Scientific Revolution The first areas of physics to receive close attention were mechanics and the study of planetary motions. Modern mechanics dates from the work of Galileo and Simon Stevin in the late 16th and early 17th cent. The great breakthrough in astronomy was made by Nicolaus Copernicus, who proposed (1543) the heliocentric model of the solar system that was later modified by Johannes Kepler (using observations by Tycho Brahe) into the description of planetary motions that is still accepted today. Galileo gave his support to this new system and applied his discoveries in mechanics to its explanation. The full explanation of both celestial and terrestrial motions was not given until 1687, when Isaac Newton published his Principia [Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy]. This work, the most important document of the Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th cent., contained Newton's famous three laws of motion and showed how the principle of universal gravitation could be used to explain the behavior not only of falling bodies on the earth but also planets and other celestial bodies in the heavens. To arrive at his results, Newton invented one form of an entirely new branch of mathematics, the calculus (also invented independently by G. W. Leibniz), which was to become an essential tool in much of the later development in most branches of physics. Other branches of physics also received attention during this period. William Gilbert, court physician to Queen Elizabeth I, published (1600) an


From Yahoo Answers

Question:

Answers:Biological: human body undergoing change from adolescent to adult (physical growth, hormones, psychology, socialization, sexual maturity) Geological: tectonic plates shifting (earthquakes, volcanoes, island/archipelago formation)

Question:

Answers:Ice melting Ball deflating Clay being molded into a new shape Chopping wood Melting butter on toast Hope this heaps :)

Question:

Answers:chemical change 1. people are breathing Physical change 1. my freezes is melting

Question:please i need help to understan more please give me 5 examples of each

Answers:phys. change: thawing chicken cutting vegetables freezing water boiliing soup shredding paper Chem. change: toasting bread burning turkey wood in fireplace microwaving aluminum making popcorn

From Youtube

Physical Changes Song :Physical Changes is performed by David Bydlowski and Fred Ribits of Science Explosion. Inkind support was provided by Wayne RESA. This song is for K-8 students and provides them with many examples of physical changes, that they will see in everyday life. It also provides the definition of physical change. For more information, please send an email to: ScienceExplosion@aol.com; k12science@me.com; bydlowd@resa.net

Examples of Chemical and Physical Changes :Caila & Tina